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Lichtenstein Creative Media.

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November 29, 2002

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THIS WEEK'S PROGRAM:

SURVIVING SUICIDE
Week of December 7, 2002

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For people who have lost a family member or friend to suicide, grief is often complicated by feelings of anger, shame, fear and guilt. Guests include Dr. Donna Barnes, president and founder of the National Organization for People of Color Against Suicide; Dr. David Clark, Director of the Center for Suicide Research and Prevention at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago; Dr. David Brent, professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Mary Kluesner and Al Kluesner, cofounders of Suicide Awareness: Voices of Education; and poet Stanley Kunitz, named United States Poet Laureate in 2000.

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THE INFINITE MIND PROGRAMS

PEACE
Week of November 29, 2002

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This week on The Infinite Mind: Peace. It's easy to say "give peace a chance," but why is that so hard to do? In this program, we explore the art and science of resolving interpersonal conflicts peacefully, examine some common obstacles to peace, sit in on a mediation session between a landlord and his angry tenant, and probe the role of interfaith dialog in promoting peace. Guests include Robert Mnookin, director of the Harvard Negotiation Research Project; peace psychologist Dan Christie, professor of psychology at the Ohio State University; psychologist Dacher Keltner, founding director of The Berkeley Center for the Development of Peace and Well-being; storyteller Heather Forest, founding director of Story Arts; Imam Omar Abu-Namous, imam of the Islamic Cultural Center of New York; Dean James Parks Morton, president of the Interfaith Center of New York; Venerable T. Kenjitsu Nakagaki, president of the Buddhist Council of New York, and Rabbi Gerry Serotta, co-chair of Rabbis for Human Rights, North America. Plus making time for peace... commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MARRIAGE
Week of November 22, 2002

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In this hour, we explore Marriage. Guests include Dr. Howard Markman, a professor of psychology at the University of Denver, whose books include the bestseller Fighting for Your Marriage; psychologist Dr. Shirley Glass, a marital and family therapist and a leading expert on infidelity; Dr. James Coyne, a professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, who researches the differing effects of good and bad marriages on health and mental health; historian Dr. Nancy Cott of Harvard University who is the author of Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation; Pamela Holm, author of The Toaster Broke, So We're Getting Married; and novelist Anne Bernays and her husband of forty-eight years, Pulitzer-Prize winning biographer Justin Kaplan. Commentary by John Hockenberry.


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ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO: NUMBERS AND THE MIND
Week of November 15, 2002

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This week on The Infinite Mind: One Potato, Two Potato: Numbers and the Mind. Why are some people math whizzes while others are scared to do simple arithmetic without a calculator? This week we explore differences in math ability; new and old debates on math education (remember "The New Math?"); the link between autism and skills in rapid-fire calculation; and Hollywood's fascination with brilliant, troubled mathematicians. Plus a trip to AT&T's research labs and some of the best minds working in mathematics today. Guests include Brian Butterworth, Professor of Cognitive Neuropsychology in the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College in London; Keith Devlin, executive director of The Center for the Study of Language and Information at Stanford University; Jeremy Kilpatrick, professor of mathematics education at the University of Georgia;Gary Mesibov, professor of psychology at The University of North Carolina; Jerry Newport; and AT&T mathematics researchers David Applegate and Jeff Lagarius. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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WEATHER AND THE MIND
Week of November 8, 2002
(Originally aired week of December 19, 2001)

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Are blue skies smiling above you? Or are you under the weather? Do you know which way the wind is blowing? We often talk about how we feel in terms of the weather, but how much does what's happening outside affect what is going on inside the human mind?

The show includes an interview with Dr. Norman Rosenthal, the author of "Winter Blues" and the developer of "the light box" as a treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder. Anthropologist Dr. Benjamin Orlove discusses how people around the world relate to their local weather. Dave Thurlow, the long time host of public radio's "Weather Notebook," speculates on the link between weather lore and optimism. Writer Jan de Blieu discusses and reads from her award-winning book "Wind: How the Flow of Air Has Shaped Life, Myth, and the Land." And we ride along with a tornado-chasing tour guide, whose itinerary across the Mid-West gives a whole new meaning to "whirlwind tour." Jungian analyst Dr. Beverley Zabriskie offers insight into our fascination with extreme weather. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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ALZHEIMER'S: RESEARCH SUCCESS STORIES

Broadcast beginning October 30, 2002

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In this hour, we explore the latest reseach on Alzheimer's, including advances in treatment, new medications that might eventually prevent the disease, and the hunt for clues to early diagnosis. Guests include Dr. Trey Sunderland, chief of the geriatric psychiatry branch of the National Institute of Mental Health; Dr. David Snowdon, the lead researcher on The Nun Study and professor of neurology at the University of Kentucky; and poet Philip Schultz, who chronicled his mother's slow decline from Alzheimer's.

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SENSE OF TOUCH

Broadcast beginning October 25, 2002

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This week on The Infinite Mind: Sense of Touch. The program explores how we use sense of touch to learn, why infants fail to thrive without touch, and the mind/body connection behind the therapeutic use of massage. Plus, how touch can make you more charismatic and from "Don't touch" to "Please touch" - tactile art you're meant to feel.

Guests include Dr. Tiffany Field, director of the Touch Research Institute, University of Miami Medical School; Dr. Susan Lederman, director of the Touch Laboratory Queen's University in Ontario; Dr. Shelby Taylor, adjunct professor of psychology at the California State University, Fullerton; Ann Cunningham, a tactile artist and teacher at The Colorado Center for the Blind; Greg Wong, a student of Ann Cunningham's; and Julie Deden, director of The Colorado Center for the Blind. Also featured is a report by Devorah Klahr on an infant massage class that Stoney Brook University Hospital offers free to parents of premature infants. Plus, John Hockenberry on what he's learned about sense of touch by living with a spinal cord injury that's led to the loss of sensation through much of his body.

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SIBLING RELATIONSHIPS

Broadcast beginning October 16, 2002

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In this hour, we explore Sibling Relationships. Four out of five Americans have a brother or sister. Best friend? Worst enemy? One thing's for sure - nobody can push your buttons like a sibling. How do the bonds between brothers and sisters change over time? Are birth order and spacing between siblings less important than we thought? We'll have the latest research. Guests include: psychologists Dr. Judy Dunn, Dr. Laurie Kramer, and Dr. Peter Goldenthal; brothers Matt Lee and Ted Lee, who share a byline in The New York Times; and the brother and sister who lead the musical group the Cowboy Junkies.

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CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

Broadcast beginning October 9, 2002

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Imagine coming down with a bad case of the flu - the kind where your whole body aches and it's hard to think straight -- and that the flu NEVER GOES AWAY. That's how many people describe what it feels like to live with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Guests include author Laura Hillenbrand, explaining why she had to write part of her bestseller, Seabiscuit, with her eyes closed; Dr. Nancy Klimas, professor of medicine and director of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome research center at the University of Miami School of Medicine; Dr. Gudrun Lange, a neuropsychologist at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; Kim Kenney, president of the Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome Association of America; and singer-songwriter Janis Ian, performing a song that she wrote months after her diagnosis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Plus, Marlene Sanders reports on why some patients and advocates think the name of this illness should be changed. Her report includes interviews with filmmaker Kim Snyder, psychologist Dr. Leonard Jason, and Dr. Anthony Komaroff. And commentary by John Hockenberry.

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TELEVISION AND THE MIND

Broadcast beginning October 2, 2002

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In this hour, we explore Television and the Mind. Nearly 99% of American households own a television. Is it a "boob tube" or a postivie influence? Guests include psychologists Dr. Daniel Anderson, Dr. Robert Kubey, and Dr. Jane Healy; Norman Lear, the creator of groundbreaking shows including All in the Family and Sanford and Son; Anthony Zuiker, the creator of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation -- the top-rated drama in America; and public-television documentary filmmaker Ric Burns. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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VOICES OF EXPERIENCE: CAMBODIAN TRAUMA IN AMERICA

Broadcast beginning September 25, 2002

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This latest in Lichtenstein Creative Media's Peabody Award-winning "Voices" series examines the mental health of Cambodian refugees living in America, and the impact of trauma on the hundreds of thousands of other refugees pouring into the United States. The program, the result of a one-year investigation by reporter Karen Brown, features an in-depth documentary special report and a follow-up discussion with Dr. Patricia Shannon of the Center for Victims of Torture in Minneapolis.

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WORK

Broadcast beginning September 18, 2002

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WORK is the third program in our three-part series Mental Health in Troubled Times: One Year After.

Live to work, or work to live? Attitudes toward work are changing. This program examines our changing relationship with the workplace: new research, the use of consumer trends in advertising; the impact on customer service and a program in which retired senior citizens staff a production line. Guests include: J. Walker Smith, president of the national market research firm Yankelovitch Partners Inc.; ArLyne Diamond, a corporate psychologist; Jess Bell, vice chairman of Bonne Bell cosmetics; marketing professor Christie Nordhielm of the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University; and advertising executives Rich Silverstein of Goodby-Silverstein, Dan Sutton of Fallon and Cheryl Berman of Leo Burnett. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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ETHICS: A NATIONAL CRISIS OF CONSCIENCE?

Broadcast beginning September 11, 2002

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Ethics: A National Crisis of Conscience? is the second program in our three-part series Mental Health in Troubled Times: One Year After.

In the days and weeks following the terrorist attacks of last year, Americans around the country joined together in grief, righteous anger, and patriotism. But over the past 12 months, we have witnessed one scandal after another -- Arthur Anderson, Enron, the Catholic Church, Martha Stewart, WorldCom -- capturing public attention and eroding public trust. This week we look at what it means to behave ethically and where some church and corporate leaders have gone wrong.

Correspondent Phillip Martin reports on an "ethical fitness" seminar at the Institute for Global Ethics, where Americans from around the country gather to talk about ethics. Dr. Goodwin's guests include Kim Clark, Dean of the Harvard Business School; Steven Pinker, professor of psychology in the department of brain and cognitive sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Father Robert Drinan, Professor of Ethics and Law, Georgetown University Law Center, Jed Emerson, a fellow at the Hewlett Foundation and a leading proponent of social responsibility in business; Mary Flood, a reporter for the Houston Chronicle who broke much of the Enron story; and singer-songwriters Suzzy and Maggie Roche perform their song "Anyway." Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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TERROR, TRAUMA AND HEALING: ONE YEAR LATER

Broadcast beginning September 4, 2002

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Terror, Trauma and Healing: One Year Later is the first in our three-part Mental Health in Troubled Times series examining how America is coping one year after September 11th.

In this hour, we look at the mental health of the nation. Guests include: world-leading trauma specialists Dr. Robert Pynoos, who is a professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and Co-Director of the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, and Dr. Randall Marshall, who is a professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University's medical school and Director of Trauma Studies for the New York State Office of Mental Health at the New York State Psychiatric Institute; The New York Times Op-Ed columnist Frank Rich; former first-lady and leading mental health advocate Rosalynn Carter; and documentary filmmaker Ric Burns, who is now adding a new episode to his already-completed mini-series about New York - a history of the World Trade Center. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MOVING

Broadcast beginning August 28, 2002

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Take your whole life, wrap it in bubble wrap, stuff it in a box, and watch four big guys load it onto a van and drive away. Stressful? You bet, and Americans do it, on the average, every five years. Dr. Thomas T. Olkowski, PhD. and Ms. Audrey McCollum, MSW, explore the psychological stresses of moving and what parents can do to make a move easier on their children. Cultural psychologist Dr. David Matsumoto shares his findings on culture shock and offers tips on how to defuse it. Singer-Songwriter Loudon Wainwright III talks about the joys of putting down roots at last, and takes us along for one of his moves in a performance of his song "Cardboard Boxes." Social historian Dr. Kenneth T. Jackson comments on the American propensity for pulling up stakes, while author Dr. Scott Sanders makes the case for staying put. We also hear from a few recent relocators, including a former New Yorker who now makes his home in North Carolina, and a family on the eve of their first night in their new home. Plus commentator John Hockenberry on rooting through cardboard boxes in search of extension cords and a can opener.

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IMAGINATION

Broadcast beginning August 21, 2002
(Broadcast originally November 21, 2001)

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In this hour, we explore Imagination. A great new job, a bigger home, a romantic evening. We all conjure up possibilities in our minds. But just what is imagination? Guests include Dr. Jerome Singer, a professor of psychology at Yale University and one of the pioneers in the study of imagination; Dr. Alan Leslie, professor of psychology and director of the Cognitive Development Laboratory at Rutgers University; Dr. Paul Harris, developmental psychologist and professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and author of The Work of the Imagination; Dr. Marjorie Taylor, professor of psychology at the University of Oregon and author of Imaginary Companions and the Children Who Create Them; and children's book writer and artist Maira Kalman. Plus commentary by John Hockenberry.

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ANIMAL COMPANIONS
Broadcast beginning August 14, 2002

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In this hour, we explore Animal Companions. Can having a fish help people with Alzheimer's disease? Does having a dog lower your risk of depression? We hear the latest research on the health and mental health benefits of having pets. Guests include Dr. Alan Beck, Director of the Center for the Human-Animal Bond at the School of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University and co-author of Between Pets and People: The Importance of Animal Companionship; Dr. Susan Cohen, a social worker at the Animal Medical Center in New York City; Dr. Harriet Ritvo, a professor of history at MIT whose books include The Animal Estate: The English and Other Creatures in the Victorian Age; and pet trainer Bash Dibra whose books include DogSpeak and Cat Speak.
Originally aired January 30, 2002.

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LAUGHTER

Broadcast beginning August 7, 2002

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We all do it. It's fun. It feels good. And many scientists say there's evidence it's good for you. This week on The Infinite Mind we look at laughter, comedy, laugh tracks, and laughter as therapy. Guests include stand-up comedian Eddie Izzard; Dr. Jo-Anne Bachorowski, assistant professor of psychology, Vanderbilt University; and Dr. Robert R. Provine, professor of psychology and neuroscience, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. We examine the pros and cons of recent research looking at laughter as therapy and hear from scientists, therapists, and patients. Plus, why does Hollywood still love the laugh track in a special report featuring writer/producer Larry Gelbart and Bill Lawrence and professional laugh-track sweetener David Maitland. Concluding the show, commentator John Hockenberry answers the age-old riddle "Why did the caterpillar cross the roadway?"

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HOARDING

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Broadcast beginning July 31, 2002

When does enough become too much? And why is it so hard for compulsive savers to know the difference? This show looks at hoarding, which involves the accumulation and inability to throw away unneeded possessions, to the point that a home may become so filled with stuff that furniture and rooms can no longer be used for their intended purposes. Guests include Dr. Randy Frost, a pioneer researcher in the study of clinical hoarding and Dr. Sanjaya Saxena, a neurobiologist who is pinpointing where in the brain the problem seems to originate. Author Denise Linn, addresses non-clinical forms of hoarding with tips on how to recognize -- and get rid of -- clutter. Plus commentary by John Hockenberry.

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HIV/AIDS AND THE MIND

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Broadcast beginning July 24, 2002

It's been twenty years since the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first cases of the illness that is now known as AIDS. Its been years since we've understood how HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- spreads. So WHY are there 40,000 new cases of HIV every year in the United States alone?

This show features a panel discussion about the psychology of HIV transmission and prevention. Dr. Susan Kegeles, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California at San Francisco; Mr. Terje Anderson, Executive Director of the National Association of People with AIDS; and Dr. Gail Wyatt, University of California in Los Angeles, probe psychological and pragmatic factors that fuel the AIDS epidemic in the USA and overseas. Panel members discuss best practice approaches to intervention -- what works, what doesn't, and why. Michael Shernoff, MSW, fields calls from listeners who are living with HIV and talks about the mental health challenges associated with living with HIV. Dr. Francine Cournos, Columbia University; and Dr. Igor Grant, University of California at San Diego, explain what HIV does to the brain. And we hear from Drew De Los Reyes, a counselor at the New York AIDS service and advocacy organization Gay Men's Health Crisis, and a young man who is trying to come to terms with his HIV diagnosis. The show concludes with a commentary from acclaimed writer Emily Carter, who recalls the years in which "the shining, subconscious stratagem of denial" was her defense against the fear she'd kept at bay for years after testing positive to HIV.

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GAMBLING

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Broadcast beginning July 17, 2002

In this hour, we explore Gambling.

Why can some people walk away from the casino, and others just can't quit? Guests include Dr. Eric Hollander, Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Compulsive, Impulsive, and Anxiety Disorders Program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City; Keith Whyte, Executive Director of the National Council on Problem Gambling; sociologist Dr. Gerda Reith, author of The Age of Chance: Gambling in Western Culture; and Joanna Franklin, chief trainer for the Institute for Problem Gambling.

Plus, commentary by John Hockenberry.

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NATIVE AMERICANS AND SUICIDE

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Broadcast beginning July 10, 2002

In this hour, we explore the high rate of suicide among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Throughout the United States, American Indians and Alaska Natives are one and a half times more likely to commit suicide than the general population. Guests include Sharon Watson, of Minnesota's Chippewa White Earth Reservation, whose son died of suicide; Dr. Spero Manson, division head at the National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research; Dr. James Thompson, deputy medical director at the American Psychiatric Association; Medicine Dream an Anchorage-based band who lost a Cheyenne friend to suicide; Diana Weber, a social worker who assists the people of the Louden Tribal Council, in Alaska; Regine Attla, a tribal administrator on preparation for a funeral; Dr. Denise Middlebrook, a public health advisor for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration; and Theda New Breast, who runs wellness workshops in Montana for American Indians and Alaska Natives . Plus commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MUSIC AND THE MIND

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Broadcast beginning July 3, 2002

Music can get us "amped up" or "mellowed out;" it can soothe, arouse, amuse, irritate, and delight us. Why? Why should mere sequences of musical sounds have such power over how we feel? And how do good musicians orchestrate that power?

"Music and the Mind" includes a round table discussion on music and emotion, featuring composer and performance artist Laurie Anderson; musicologist Dr. David Huron, Professor of Music and Director of the Cognitive and Systematic Musicology Laboratory at Ohio State University; and neuroscientist Dr. Mark Jude Tramo, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard University. In a special report on "Muzak and the Mind," the Infinite Mind's Devorah Klahr hears from Alvin Collis, Vice President of Audio Architecture at the Muzak Corporation.

Reporter Eva Neuberg looks into the so-called "Mozart effect" with Dr. Lawrence Parsons, National Science Foundation; Dr. William Thompson, Professor of Music, York University; Dr. Lori Custadero, Teachers College, Columbia University; and Dr. Frances Rauscher, Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Pianist Emanuel Ax compares the joys of Mozart to the joys of procreation.

Plus commentator John Hockenberry talks about Hendrix, Beethoven, and N'Sync, and plays the flute (not at the same time).

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MENTAL ILLNESS IN THE FAMILY

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Broadcast beginning June 26, 2002

In this hour, we explore Mental Illness in the Family. Anger. Frustration. Resentment. Helplessness. If someone in your family has mental illness, may be feeling all of these things. What can you do to help your loved one AND yourself? Guests include: Dr. David Miklowitz, a professor of psychology at The University of Colorado-Boulder and author of The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide: What You and Your Family Need to Know; Dr. Lisa Dixon, an associate professor of medicine and psychiatry at The University of Maryland, where her research focuses on schizophrenia and family treatment; Dr. William Beardslee, a professor of child psychiatry at Harvard Medical school, Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Boston's Children's Hospital, and author of Out of the Darkened Room: Protecting the Children and Strengthening the Family When a Parent is Depressed; Julie Totten, founder of Families for Depression Awareness; and Rose Styron, wife of writer William Styron, who suffers from major depression. Sharon Lerner with a special report on parents that have had to give up custody of their ill children to foster care when their mental health insurance runs out. And commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MENTAL ILLNESS AND THE MEDIA

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Broadcast beginning June 19, 2002

Does the media's portrayal of people with mental illnesses present the public with an accurate picture?

In today's program, we explore the links between the preponderance of negative portrayals of people with mental illnesses in the media and widespread discrimination against those affected with these illnesses. Then we probe what really goes on in a newsroom, and explore how stories about people with mental illnesses can make for "must watch" television that's dramatically compelling and accurate.

Guests include Dr. Bernice Pescosolido, Director of the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research at Indiana University; Dr. Otto Wahl, professor of psychology at George Mason University; David Gonzalez, an advocate for people with mental illnesses; Liz Spikol, managing editor for the Philadelphia Weekly; Don Sapatkin, health and science editor for the Philadelphia Inquirer; Dr. Neal Baer, executive producer of NBC's popular television show Law and Order: Special Victims Unit and former executive producer and writer of ER; and Bill Lichtenstein documentary filmmaker and the executive producer of The Infinite Mind.

Plus commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MONEY AND THE MIND

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Broadcast beginning June 12, 2002

In this hour, we explore Money and the Mind.

Guests include: behavioral economists Dr. Eldar Shafir, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University, Dr. Robert Frank, Professor of Economics, Ethics and Public Policy at Cornell University, and Dr. Andrew Oswald, Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick in England; James Cramer, co-founder of TheStreet.com and SmartMoney magazine; and writer Sandra Cisneros.


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THE MUSIC OF THE INFINITE MIND

Broadcast beginning June 5, 2002

In this hour, a special presentation:The Music of The Infinite Mind. From the very beginning, The Infinite Mind has set out to explore the science AND art of the human mind. As you'll hear today, in our four years, a number of extraordinary musicians -- and a few moonlighting scientists -- have joined us to offer their artistic perspective on a range of topics - from autism to parenting to moving.

We thought it would be fun to take the tapes off the shelf, dust them off, and take a listen to some of these magical performances. Guests include Suzanne Vega; Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, the singing scientist; Jessye Norman; psychiatrist and pianist Dr. Richard Kogan; Laurie Berkner; Louden Wainwright III; Dar Williams; and Judy Collins.


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THE BROKEN TRUST: SEXUAL ABUSE OF CHILDREN

Week of May 29, 2002

Recent allegations against priests and educators are bringing new attention to the subject of child sexual abuse, but the majority of children who are victimized never tell an adult, much less report the abuse to police. Yet the opportunity to be heard, believed, and helped can be critical in decreasing a victim's risks for profound and lasting problems associated with this abuse. These risks include post traumatic stress disorder, suicidal depression, drug abuse, and the possibility that a victim will grow up to be a victimizer.

In the first half of this program we hear from adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse and explore how therapy and art-making can help victims heal. Guests include psychologist Dr. Esther Deblinger, clinical director of the Center for Children's Support at The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; filmmaker James Ronald Whitney, the director of the documentary "Just, Melvin;" and adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. In the program's second half, we explore what we know about treatment for pedophilia with Nick, who has served time for molesting children and now works with an innovative educational organization called Stop It Now; Fran Henry, the president of Stop It Now; Dr. Carol Ball, a psychologist at New England Forensic Associates;and psychiatrist Dr. John Bradford, director of the forensic psychiatry program at Canada's Royal Ottawa Hospital. Commentary from John Hockenberry concludes the program.


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THE GOLDEN YEARS? MENTAL HEALTH AND THE ELDERLY
Week of May 22, 2002
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In this hour, we explore The Golden Years? Mental Health and the Elderly. Guests include Dr. Ira Katz, director of the geriatric psychiatry program at the University of Pennsylvania; Dr. Mildred Reynolds, a retired psychiatric social worker who has, herself, been diagnosed with depression and is now on the board of the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association and an advocate for elderly people with mental illness; Dr. Ellen Langer, a professor of psychology at Harvard University and the author of Mindfulness and The Power of Mindful Learning; and English professor and writer Carolyn Heilbrun, author of The Last Gift of Time: Life Beyond Sixty.


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THE HIDDEN COSTS OF MENTAL ILLNESS

Broadcast beginning May 15, 2002

What are the hidden costs of mental illnesses? In recent weeks, the White House and Capitol Hill have weighed the potential benefits and costs of requiring health insurers to provide treatment for psychiatric disorders. This week on "The Infinite Mind" we turn to the cost of NOT treating them. Dr. Peter Kramer guest hosts this program for the vacationing Dr. Fred Goodwin. Guests include Ronald Kessler, a sociologist at the Harvard Medical School Department of Health Care Policy; Paul Greenberg, an economist at the Analysis Group in Cambridge, Massachusetts; and Dr. Greg Simon of Seattle's pioneering Group Health Cooperative. And sharing a front-line view of the frequent intersections between untreated psychiatric illnesses and hospital emergency rooms are Dr. Herbert Pardes, president and chief executive officer of the New York Presbyterian Hospital; and Dr. David Goldschmitt, who runs the emergency room at New York University Downtown Hospital. Commentary by John Hockenberry.


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SURVIVING SUICIDE

Broadcast beginning May 8, 2002

For people who have lost a family member or friend to suicide, grief is often complicated by feelings of anger, shame, fear and guilt. Guests include Dr. Donna Barnes, president and founder of the National Organization for People of Color Against Suicide; Dr. David Clark, Director of the Center for Suicide Research and Prevention at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago; Dr. David Brent, professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Mary Kluesner and Al Kluesner, cofounders of Suicide Awareness: Voices of Education; and poet Stanley Kunitz, named United States Poet Laureate in 2000.


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PSYCHOANALYSIS

Week of May 1, 2002

In this hour, we explore Psychoanalysis, including what's new since Freud's day, new theories on the unconscious, and the role of the analyst's couch in movies. Guests include: Dr. Glen Gabbard, Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Baylor Psychiatry Clinic at the Baylor College of Medicine and author of Love and Hate in the Analytic Setting and Psychiatry and the Cinema; Dr. Susan Vaughan, author of The Talking Cure: The Science Behind Psychotherapy; Dr. Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a philosopher and psychoanalyst whose books include Cherishment: A Psychology of the Heart and Anna Freud: A Biography. Plus, we'll talk to writer, director and producer David Grubin about his new film Young Dr. Freud and to psychoanalyst Dr. Frederick Levenson about the new matchmaking service, Theradate.


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HYPNOSIS

Week of April 24, 2002

"You are growing verrrr-yyyyy sleeee-ppy." You may have heard Hollywood's version of hypnosis. This week, "The Infinite Mind" explores the science behind hypnosis and how it really works. We look at how and why medical doctors, dentists, therapists, and police investigators use this powerful tool to soothe pain, lose bad habits, reconstruct memories, and even solve crimes. Experts in hypnosis separate science fact from science fiction, answering questions like "Could a hypnotist make someone fall in love through hypnosis?" and "Could an unscrupulous person use hypnosis to make someone commit a crime?" Guests include Dr. David Spiegel, Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine; Jane Parsons-Fein, Director of the Parsons-Fein Institute for Hypnosis and Psychotherapy; Alan Scheflin, Professor of Law at Santa Clara University; and forensic psychologist Dr. Melvin Gravitz. Plus commentary - with a nod to Dick van Dyke - from John Hockenberry,


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PREJUDICE
Week of April 17, 2002 Order a TIM transcript or audiotape!

In this hour, we explore the topic of Prejudice. Why do human beings so often divide the world into "us" and "them?" Whether it's black or white, young or old, gay or straight, people often make irrational presumptions about others. This week, we explore the psychology of prejudice with social psychologists Dr. Mahzarin Banaji of Harvard University, Dr. Susan Fiske of Princeton University and Dr. Gregory Herek of the University of California at Davis. And we talk to writer Esmeralda Santiago, journalist Ellis Cose, and filmmakers Marco Williams and Whitney Dow about the psychological effects of prejudice.


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ANGER

Broadcast Week of April 10, 2002

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Anger can be the most natural emotion in the world... and the most destructive. In "Anger" we explore the differences between constructive and destructive forms of anger, talk with a comedian and Academy Award winning actress about anger on stage, hear about the Tibetan Buddhist perspective on anger, and reflect on the role that this explosive emotion plays in ongoing struggles in the Middle East. Guests include comedian Lewis Black; author and psychiatrist Dr. Norman Rosenthal, professor of clinical psychiatry at Georgetown University; Academy and Tony Award-winning actress Mercedes Ruehl, now playing a spurned wife in Edward Albee's new play, "The Goat: Or who is Sylvia?" and Dr. Robert Thurman, professor of religion at Columbia University and president of New York City's Tibet House. Commentary by John Hockenberry focuses on what may be the world's angriest spot, the Middle East.


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MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Week of April 3, 2002

Order a TIM transcript or audiotape!In this hour, we explore the chronic neurological disease Multiple Sclerosis. Guests include Dr. Randall Schapiro, founder and director of the Fairview Multiple Sclerosis Center and Minneapolis Clinic Multiple Sclerosis Program; Dr. Patricia O'Looney, director of biomedical research programs at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; Barbara Paley-Israel, a writer who was diagnosed with MS in 1986 and has become an advocate for people with the disease; social worker Deborah Miller, Director of Comprehensive Care at the Mellen Center for MS Treatment and Research, part of The Cleveland Clinic; TONY award-winning director and playwright Emily Mann; and special commentator Zoe Koplowitz, author of Winning Spirit: Life Lessons Learned in Last Place.


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MUSIC AND THE MIND

Broadcast beginning March 27, 2002

Music can get us "amped up" or "mellowed out;" it can soothe, arouse, amuse, irritate, and delight us. Why? Why should mere sequences of musical sounds have such power over how we feel? And how do good musicians orchestrate that power? "Music and the Mind" includes a round table discussion on music and emotion, featuring composer and performance artist Laurie Anderson; musicologist Dr. David Huron, Professor of Music and Director of the Cognitive and Systematic Musicology Laboratory at Ohio State University; and neuroscientist Dr. Mark Jude Tramo, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard University. In a special report on "Muzak and the Mind," the Infinite Mind's Devorah Klahr hears from Alvin Collis, Vice President of Audio Architecture at the Muzak Corporation. Reporter Eva Neuberg looks into the so-called "Mozart effect" with Dr. Lawrence Parsons, National Science Foundation; Dr. William Thompson, Professor of Music, York University; Dr. Lori Custadero, Teachers College, Columbia University; and Dr. Frances Rauscher, Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Pianist Emanuel Ax compares the joys of Mozart to the joys of procreation. Plus commentator John Hockenberry talks about Hendrix, Beethoven, and N'Sync, and plays the flute (not at the same time).


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BEYOND THE BABY BLUES:
POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION AND PSYCHOSIS


Broadcast beginning March 20, 2002
(An encore presentation. Winner of a 2002 National Headliner Award.)

Texas mother Andrea Yates drowned her five children; her family says she was suffering from postpartum depression and psychosis. This week, we look beyond the headlines to explore these potentially devastating illnesses. Guests include psychiatrist Dr. Deborah Sichel, who co-founded the Hestia Institute, a mental health center for women and families; law expert Michelle Oberman, who has written about mothers who kill their children; and Dr. Joseph Hibbeln, a psychiatrist, lipid biologist and Chief of the Outpatient Clinic at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health; and women who have suffered from these illnesses.


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ATTENTION DEFICIT IN CHILDREN
Week of March 6, 2002


Fidgeting, daydreaming, not paying attention to the teacher, a preoccupation with "Gameboy"... are these characteristics of a typical American kid or signs of an underlying neurobiological disorder? In this show, we explore attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. Guests include Dr. Peter Jensen, director of the Center for the Advancement of Children's Mental Health at Columbia University; Dr. Stephen Hinshaw, professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley; Clarke Ross, chief executive officer of CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder); Debbie Zimmett, author of the children's book Eddie Enough. We hear also from parents of children who have been diagnosed with ADHD... some say incorrectly... and a teenager who had to take on the local Board of Education to get the help he needed in school. And commentary by John Hockenberry.

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DYSLEXIA
Broadcast beginning week of February 20, 2002

As many as 1 in 7 American children are affected to some degree by dyslexia, which disables language skills but often bestows special abilities in the visual and spatial realm. This program explores what dyslexia is, and what it is not, with guests including author and producer Stephen J. Cannell, Thomas Viall of the International Dyslexia Association, Yale researcher Dr. Sally Shaywitz, Toronto entrepreneur Jay Mandarino, author Thomas G. West, virtual reality pioneer Daniel Sandin, children's author Jeanne Betancourt and her daughter, filmmaker Nicole Betancourt.

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STATE OF MIND: AMERICA 2002
A special two-hour town hall broadcast from The Infinite Mind

Order a CD or transcript of State of Mind: America 2002.

State of Mind: America 2002 is an unprecedented town hall gathering of top mental health experts including Tipper Gore, Rosalynn Carter, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher, along with performers Jessye Norman, Judy Collins, and Al Franken, and 500 people from across the country.

The program is co-hosted by Dr. Fred Goodwin and John Hockenberry and is airing on public radio stations across the country. The show was recorded February 7, 2002 at The Museum of Television & Radio in New York City and The National Press Club in Washington D.C. This special broadcast is co-sponsored by public radio stations WNYC/New York and WAMU 88.5FM/Washington, DC.

An extended educational outreach campaign will accompany the broadcast, produced in conjunction with the National Mental Health Association, the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, the National Depressive and Manic Depressive Association and the National Mental Health Awareness Campaign.

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HANDEDNESS
Week of February 6, 2002



What do Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, and The Infinite Mind's host, Dr. Fred Goodwin, have in common? They're all left-handed. In this all-new program, we'll explore what handedness had to do with the development of language; the connection between left handedness and dyslexia, alcoholism, and shorter life expectancies; and why lefties may have a creative edge.

Plus, verbal wizard Richard Lederer on southpaws, righteousness, and the radical turkey (it had two left wings); and commentary by John Hockenberry.

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WASTING AWAY: ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA
Week of January 23, 2002



Why does food become a deadly enemy for some people? This week, we look at anorexia and bulimia. Guests include Dr. Kelly Brownell, Director of the Yale University Center for Eating and Weight Disorders; Dr. Joan Jacobs Brumberg, a historian at Cornell University and author of Fasting Girls: The History of Anorexia Nervosa and The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls; Dr. Walter Kaye, director of the eating disorders clinic at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and an expert on genetics; and Marya Hornbacher, author of Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia.

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LIES, LIES, LIES
Week of January 9, 2002

This week, in an encore presentation, The Infinite Mind takes a look at lying, from the vague lies of politeness (for instance, "Fine, thank you" or "You look wonderful") to serious lies ("I didn't do it," for example).

The show starts off with a look at a character from the children's animated show "Rugrats," and follows up with a look at real children, with child psychiatrist Dr. Elizabeth Berger. Dr. Paul Ekman, University of California, San Francisco, clues us into what he's found in over thirty years of researching why and how people lie. J.J. Newberry, of the Institute of Analytic Interviewing, tells us how he puts Dr. Ekman's findings into action in training police. And is lying in therapy necessarily bad? According to some psychiatrists, lies, fantasy, dreams, and the truth itself are all grist for the mill. We also hear from filmmaker Pola Rapaport, about her recent documentary, "Family Secrets." Plus, John Hockenberry recalls the Rodney King case, in which the adage "the camera never lies" was turned on its head.


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ATTACHMENT
Week of January 2, 2002

It's human to connect. Without the opportunity for consistent relationships early in life, though, development founders. This show explores attachment disorder and attachment problems that affect children who have been abused and neglected.

Guests include psychiatrist Dr. Charles Zeanah, clinical psychologist Robert Karen, Thais Tepper, the founder of the Network for the Post-Institutionalized Child, and Joyce Peters, the adoptive mother of a child with attachment disorder.


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SHYNESS
Week of December 26, 2001


Everyone feels shy sometimes. Have you ever wondered what's going on in our minds and bodies when we experience shyness? This week, we look into both the social aspects and the biology of shyness. Guests include singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega, who talks about being a shy performer; Dr. Bernardo Carducci, the Director of the Shyness Research Institute at Indiana University Southeast; and two preeminent developmental psychologists, Dr. Jerome Kagan and Dr. Nathan Fox, who discuss whether shyness is an inborn trait. We also visit a support a support group for shy people.


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WEATHER AND THE MIND
Week of December 19, 2001

Are blue skies smiling above you? Or are you under the weather? Do you know which way the wind is blowing? We often talk about how we feel in terms of the weather, but how much does what's happening outside affect what is going on inside the human mind?

The show includes an interview with Dr. Norman Rosenthal, the author of "Winter Blues" and the developer of "the light box" as a treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder. Anthropologist Dr. Benjamin Orlove discusses how people around the world relate to their local weather. Dave Thurlow, the long time host of public radio's "Weather Notebook," speculates on the link between weather lore and optimism. Writer Jan de Blieu discusses and reads from her award-winning book "Wind: How the Flow of Air Has Shaped Life, Myth, and the Land." And we ride along with a tornado-chasing tour guide, whose itinerary across the Mid-West gives a whole new meaning to "whirlwind tour." Jungian analyst Dr. Beverley Zabriskie offers insight into our fascination with extreme weather. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MIGRAINE
December 12, 2001

When most of us get a headache, we take aspirin and wait for it to go away. But for the 30 million Americans who suffer from migraine headaches, the "two aspirins and call me in the morning" approach isn't a valid option. As recent studies have shown, migraine is a neurological condition, and too often it is debilitating. This show brings together scientists and "migraineurs" to share the latest research on migraine and talk over what's going on in the brains and lives of people with migraine.

Guests include neurologist Dr. Stuart Tepper, the director at the New England Center for Headache in Stamford; Michael John Coleman, Executive Director and founder of MAGNUM, The National Migraine Association; Dr. Stephen J. Peroutka, a geneticist who has succeeded in pinpointing several of the genes associated with migraine; and Dr. Oliver Sacks, renowned as a neurologist and author, but perhaps less well-known as a migraine sufferer.

Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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ART AND MADNESS
December 5 , 2001

Images of the tormented artist, poet, painter and composer are familiar. but is there really a link between madness and art? Guests include: actress Margot Kidder; Dr. Louis Sass, a professor of clinical psychology and comparative literature at Rutgers University; Dr. David Schuldberg, a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Montana in Missoula; Dr. Richard Kogan, a psychiatrist and concert pianist; Linda Gray Sexton, writer and daughter of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Anne Sexton. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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NATIVE AMERICANS AND SUICIDE
November 28, 2001

In this hour, we explore the high rate of suicide among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Throughout the United States, American Indians and Alaska Natives are one and a half times more likely to commit suicide than the general population.

Guests include Sharon Watson, of Minnesota's Chippewa White Earth Reservation, whose son died of suicide; Dr. Spero Manson, division head at the National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research; Dr. James Thompson, deputy medical director at the American Psychiatric Association; Medicine Dream an Anchorage-based band who lost a Cheyenne friend to suicide; Diana Weber, a social worker who assists the people of the Louden Tribal Council, in Alaska; Regine Attla, a tribal administrator on preparation for a funeral; Dr. Denise Middlebrook, a public health advisor for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration; and Theda New Breast, who runs wellness workshops in Montana for American Indians and Alaska Natives .

Plus commentary by John Hockenberry.

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A NEW "NORMAL?"
November 14, 2001

Living with the threat of terrorist attacks, we wonder: is fear, anxiety and disorientation our new way of life? We talk about "getting back to normal," but perhaps this is it. This special program explores what we all can do to cope with our inner uncertainty, and, perhaps, strike a blow against terrorism in the process. The program also looks at how the nation's mental health system is coping with this national crisis. Guests include: Mary Guardino, of Freedom From Fear; Dr. Robert Ursano, expert in the psychological effects of crisis and disaster; Cynthia Folcarelli, executive vice president of the National Mental Health Association; Giselle Stolper, executive director of the Mental Health Association of New York; Dr. Russ Newman, executive director for professional practice for the American Psychological Association; and Avner Tavori, an Israeli-born television and radio journalist. With commentary by John Hockenberry. Special program note: Click here for special outreach materials that you can use to continue this discussion in your own community.

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OVEREATING AND OBESITY
November 7, 2001

Three out of five Americans are overweight or obese by medical standards - it's an epidemic. Guests include Dr. Barbara Rolls, professor of Nutrition and Biobehavioral health at Pennsylvania State University; Dr. Rudolph Leibel, professor of Pediatrics and Medicine in the Institute of Human Nutrition at Columbia University's medical school; Dr. Michael Devlin, associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University's Medical School and clinical co-cirector of the Eating Disorders Research Unit at the New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, author of Holy Hunger: A Woman's Journey from Food Addiction to Spiritual Fulfillment. Plus commentary by John Hockenberry.

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HIV/AIDS AND THE MIND
October 31, 2001

It's been twenty years since the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first cases of the illness that is now known as AIDS. Its been years since we've understood how HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- spreads. So why are there 40,000 new cases of HIV every year in the United States alone? This show features a discussion about the psychology of HIV transmission and prevention. Dr. Susan Kegeles, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California at San Francisco; Mr. Terje Anderson, Executive Director of the National Association of People with AIDS; and Dr. Gail Wyatt, University of California in Los Angeles, probe psychological and pragmatic factors that fuel the AIDS epidemic in the USA and overseas. Panel members discuss best practice approaches to intervention -- what works, what doesn't, and why. Michael Shernoff, MSW, fields calls from listeners who are living with HIV and talks about the mental health challenges associated with living with HIV. Dr. Francine Cournos, Columbia University; and Dr. Igor Grant, University of California at San Diego, explain what HIV does to the brain. And we hear from Drew De Los Reyes, a counselor at the New York AIDS service and advocacy organization Gay Men's Health Crisis, and a young man who is trying to come to terms with his HIV diagnosis. The show concludes with a commentary from acclaimed writer Emily Carter, who recalls the years in which "the shining, subconscious stratagem of denial" was her defense against the fear she'd kept at bay for years after testing positive to HIV.

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EXERCISE AND THE MIND
October 24, 2001

In this hour, we explore Exercise and the Mind. Guests include Olypmic athlete Marla Runyan; Dr. John Ratey, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of A User's Guide to the Brain; Dr. James Blumenthal, professor of medical psychology at Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Kristine Yaffe, assistant professor of psychiatry, neurology and epidemiology at the University of California at San Francisco; Dr. Monika Fleshner, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology and the Center for Neurosciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder. We'll also talk to New York Giants football player Greg Comella about yoga. Our guest host is Dr. Susan Vaughan.

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SENSE OF SMELL
October 17, 2001

You're visiting a friend for dinner. How does the simple act of sniffing the air tell you if you'll be having curry for dinner... or lasagna? This show explores the sophisticated chemical sensing system we know as sense of smell. Dr. Stuart Firestein, Professor of Biology at Columbia University, describes new breakthroughs in our understanding of how we recognize smells. Dr. Sophia Grojsman, of International Flavors and Fragrances, talks about the blend of artistry and chemistry that she brings to her work as a perfume creator. Aromatherapist Trigve Harris, owner of New York's essential oils store Enfleurage, recommends essential oils to comfort the grief-stricken and soothe the frazzled. Joseph "Jofish" Kaye, of the Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, explores new uses of scent to convey abstract information. Dr. Sarah Rachel Herz, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Brown University, shares her findings on the emotionaly link between sense of smell and memory. And anthropologist Dr. David Howes, of Montreal's Concordia University, offers insight into olfactory codes the world over.

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HOW TO CHOOSE A THERAPIST
October 10, 2001

In this hour, we explore How to Choose a Therapist. As tensions rise at home and abroad, more people than ever are seeking professional help.

We'll hear from the nation's top mental health officials, including Dr. Steven Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health and Dr. Bernard Arons, director of the nation's Center for Mental Health Services. We'll also speak with Dr. Susan Vaughan, an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University medical school and the author of The Talking Cure: The Science Behind Psychotherapy.

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RESILIENCE
October 3, 2001

How is it that adversity can defeat some people, and bring out the best in others? In the shadow of the recent terrorist attacks on the United States, many Americans have risen to new challenge with courage and grace. This show explores what lets some people not only "bounce back" from disaster, but even gain in strength through adversity. The show includes interviews with psychologist Dr. Al Siebert, author of The Survivor Personality; and Dr. Karen Reivich, Co-Director of the Penn Resiliency Project at the University of Pennsylvania. One of the world's best known neuro-biologists, Dr. Robert Sapolsky, discusses how stress harms us... and helps us. And storyteller Laura Simms shares an Arabic story that reveals how even in grief we are not alone. Plus, John Hockenberry contributes a moving, insightful commentary on volcanos, SCUD missiles, terrorism, and resiliency.


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MENTAL HEALTH IN TROUBLED TIMES
September 26, 2001

This week, we explore Mental Health in Troubled Times with a compilation of common sense, science and psychology on topics such as courage, altruism, trauma, grieving, group psychology, and anxiety from some of our best programs.

According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, 7 out of 10 Americans feel depressed, nearly half have had trouble concentrating, and nearly one-third report having trouble sleeping at night. We offer insight into these reactions and perspective on a range of psychological issues now affecting all of our lives.

Guests include members of Rescue Company One, the New York City Fire Department's oldest rescue team; noted anxiety researcher Dr. Michael Davis of Emory University; Dr. Matthew Friedman, director of the National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; Dr. Daniel Goldhagen, author of Hitler's Willing Executioners; and a discussion about altruism with a Buddhist lama, an Episcopal priest, a Muslim imam and a Jewish rabbi.


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THE INFINITE MIND SPECIAL REPORT:
TERROR: TRAUMA AND HEALING

September 19, 2001

The United States has just witnessed the worst terrorist attacks in our nation's history. How can we begin to cope? How can we come to terms with the unthinkable? And how can we help our children through this difficult time? We hear from Ms. Akiko Mitsui, who worked for Fuji Bank in the World Trade Center for fifteen years. Ms. Mitsui shares her experience and her plea against rebuilding the towers where so many people's lives ended in the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001. Dr. Carol North, a psychiatrist who has studied survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing, and psychologist Dr. Doris Brothers offer listeners insight into short and long-term reactions to trauma. Senator Pete Domenici, Republican from New Mexico, assesses the government's readiness to respond to what may become a far-reaching crisis in mental health. And child psychologist Dr. Anne Marie Albano provides practical advice to parents and other adults in how to help children through grief and trauma. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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THE CLOSING OF HAVERFORD STATE: A SPECIAL REPORT
Week of September 12, 2001
(Originally aired week of March 15, 1999)



What happens when a psychiatric hospital closes down? Veteran radio correspondent
Joanne Silberner
took a year off from National Public Radio news to investigate the closing of one such hospital near Philadelphia. In this one-hour documentary, exclusive to The Infinite Mind, she follows the stories of patients and staff as they start their new lives.

This special report has won three major journalism awards since it was first broadcast in 1999, including a Clarion Award from the Association of Women in Communication, an EDI Award from National Easter Seals and a Deadline Award from Sigma Delta Chi, the Society of Professional Journalists.
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PARAPSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PSYCHICS
Broadcast beginning September 4, 2001

Psychics, ESP, ghosts - do these things have anything to do with science? This week we look beyond the rational world to explore parapsychology - the scientific study of psychic and paranormal phenomena. Guests include intuitive psychiatrist Dr. Judith Orloff, parapsychologists Dr. Charles Tart and Dr. Marilyn Schlitz; folklore researcher Dr. Bill Ellis, author of Aliens, Ghosts and Cults: Legends We Live; and psychic Barbara Stabiner.


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DYSTHYMIA
Broadcast beginning August 29, 2001

Do you know someone who never seems to experience joy? Whether it be a new pair of shoes, a new job, or even a raise - they never look happy and their personality always seems "blah." It's something that used to be thought to be a personality disorder, but the mental health community now recognizes these symptoms to be a mood disorder. It's a chronic low-level depression called "dysthymia." And if left untreated, or misdiagnosed, which is what often happens, it can last for a lifetime. Guests include; web designer Kristy Mclean, who has dysthymia; research psychiatrist Dr. John Markowitz of Payne-Whitney Clinic in New York; composer and author Mary Rodgers on her depression and that of her father, composer Richard Rodgers; author and psychiatrist Dr. Peter Kramer and comedian Lisa Kaplan, who makes depression part of her act.


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TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
Broadcast beginning August 22, 2001

According to the Center for Disease Control, 50,000 people die each year of traumatic brain injury in the United States, and another 230,000 are hospitalized for traumatic brain injury and survive. One out of three of those survivors will experience the onset of permanent disability. In this show, traumatic brain injury survivor Richard Roe shares his story with us. We hear from neurosurgeons Dr. Ross Bullock and Dr. Randy Chesnut about why the brain is so vulnerable to this sort of injury, and what can be done regain previous levels of functioning. Neuropsychologist Dr. George Carnevale, of New Jersey's Kessler Institute, fields calls from survivors and their families, and discusses the impact of an injury on a survivor's personality, short term memory, and thinking. He also discusses the need for the survivor's family to get adequate support. Filmmaker Daniel Yoon, who survived a traumatic brain injury and went on to write, direct, and star in the autobiographical "Post Concussion," contributes a commentary on nineteenth century traumatic brain injury survivor Phineas P. Gage. And commentator John Hockenberry muses on our discomfort with the gray areas of gray matter.


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PAM'S STORY
Broadcast beginning July 25, 2001


Pam's Story originally aired October 11, 2000.

Since then, it was honored by the International Radio Festival and the Gracie Awards.

We are pleased to present this encore presentation.


Pam's Story is a special one-hour The Infinite Mind documentary which takes an in-depth look at a topic we rarely discuss--the death of a baby in utero and how a family copes with the loss. Producer Cindi Deutschman follows her sister Pam for two years, as she grieves the death of her stillborn daughter Abrianna and embarks on another pregnancy. Stillbirth accounts for 7 out of every 1000 births. About 26,000 babies are stillborn each year in the United States. Most of us know someone--a parent, friend, sibling, coworker, or acquaintance--who has experienced a pregnancy loss of some kind, and yet we never talk about it.

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PERFECT PITCH

Broadcast beginning July 18, 2001

Why can some people name a note as soon as they hear it when others can't tell one from another? In this hour, we'll explore the mysterious ability known as perfect pitch. A cellist with perfect pitch will give a guided tour through the notes and keys. We'll also hear from a psychologist and geneticist who have different ideas about how many people have perfect pitch and why. And a report on Williams Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder which can cause physical and mental problems - and a sensitivity to music and pitch. Guests include: Gordon Grubb, a cellist with the Grossmont Symphony; Dr. Dan Levitin, a record producer and psychology professor at McGill University; Dr. Peter Gregersen, Chief of the Division of Biology and Human Genetics North Shore University Hospital; Dr. Ursula Bellugi, professor and director of the laboratory for cognitive neuroscience at the Salk Institute; Dr. Glen Schellenberg, professor of psychology at the University of Toronto; and Dr. Howard Lenhoff, professor emeritus at the University of California at Irvine. Commentary by John Hockenberry

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CYBERPSYCH:
MENTAL HEALTH ON THE INTERNET


Broadcast beginning July 11, 2001


In this age of cyber-everything, it's hard to imagine anything that can't be gotten on-line, and that includes mental health information and services. In this hour, we discuss Internet mental health in terms of treatment, ethics, privacy, law and money. Guests include: psychologist and researcher John Grohol of HelpHorizons.com; clinical psychologist and attorney Dr. Russ Newman, executive director for the professional practice for the American Psychological Association; attorney and psychiatrist Dr. Gregg Bloche, professor and co-director of the Georgetown/Johns Hopkins Joint Program in Law and Public Health; and Internet pyschotherapist Dr. Richard Sansbury, who has also practiced traditional therapy for more than 20 years. Web consultant Martha Ainsworth reads excerpts from her own on-line therapy.

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BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER
Broadcast beginning week of July 4, 2001


Statistics on Borderline Personality Disorder can be hard to come by. But reliable estimates indicate as many as one in fifty Americans may suffer from the disorder. It was first recognized in the 1930s, but therapists still argue over how to define and treat it. In fact, many object to the name itself, since personality disorders are often seen as less "serious" than the major mental illnesses like schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder.

This week on The Infinite Mind, we learn about the symptoms of BPD, why it is so frustrating for therapists to treat it, and a new form of therapy that has been effective.

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COURAGE

Broadcast beginning week of June 20, 2001


What separates the ordinary neighbor from the heroic life-saver? The bystander from the holocaust rescuer? We'll look at the science and spectacle of courage.

Guests on this show include sociologist Samuel Oliner, writer and lawyer, Harriet Johnson, psychologist Marvin Zuckerman, Carnegie medalist James Stack, and Tony Tedeschi, Ed Mislynski, and George Healy from the New York City Fire Department's Rescue Company One. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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WOMEN AND MENTAL ILLNESS
Broadcast beginning week of June 13, 2001

Women are more likely to have clinical depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. And their roles - particularly as mothers - can further compound their mental health problems. This program explores both the biological and social forces shaping women's experience of mental illness. Guests include Charlotte Willis, a mother and participant in the Thresholds Mothers Program, Rush Medical College professor of psychiatry Nada Stotland, documentary maker and women's studies professor, Allie Light, and Harvard University psychiatrist Lee Cohen. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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STUTTERING
Broadcast beginning June 6, 2001

We all trip over words sometimes, but for three million Americans, it's a constant struggle. This hour of The Infinite Mind explores the underlying neural mechanisms of stuttering, its genetic implications and the social and psychological effects on stutterers. Guests include: Michael Liben, 15 year old stutterer; Dr. Gerald Maguire, psychiatrist, stutterer and director of residency training at University of California at Irvine; Dr. Ben Watson, speech physiologist and director of the Master of Science program in speech-language pathology at New York Medical College; Catherine Montgomery, speech language pathologist; Jeff Shames, documentary filmmaker and stutterer. Commentary by John Hockenberry.
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HABIT
Broadcast beginning May 30, 2001

Why do we do the things we do -- over and over and over again? In this show, we explore habit. Guests include Dr. Ann Graybiel, a professor of neuroanatomy in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT; Dr. Kurt Fischer, the director of the Mind, Brain & Education program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education; Dr. Bruce Masek, the clinical director of Child Psychology at Massachusetts General Hospital and an associate professor at Harvard Medical School; and stand-up comic Sean Conroy. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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TOP 10 DISCOVERIES FROM THE DECADE OF THE BRAIN
Broadcast beginning May 23, 2001


The decade of the brain, which ends this year, marked an acceleration of neuroscience research. This show takes a lookat some of the astounding progress we've made in that decade, highlighting the ten most important breakthroughs. Guests include Dr. Guy McKhann, associate director for clinical research at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, associate professor of neurobiology at the Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Jeffrey Kordower, director of research at the Center for Brain Repair at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center; and Dr. Ronald McKay, chief of the laboratory of molecular biology at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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AI: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Week of May 9, 2001

Here we are in the year 2001, and - despite the movie's predictions-- computers have yet to develop minds of their own. How close are we to developing machines that can simulate human thought? This week on the Infinite Mind, we look at the latest research on Artificial Intelligence. Guests include Brian Aldiss, writer of the short-story, "Super Toys Last All Summer Long," which is the inspiration for Steven Spielberg's upcoming movie, AI: Artificial Intelligence; Dr. Peter Norvig, co-author of the standard textbook on AI, Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach and Chief of the Computational Sciences Division at NASA's Ames Research Center in California; Dr. Rosalind Picard, founder and director of the Affective Computing Research Group at the MIT Media Lab; and Dr. Marvin Minsky, a pioneer in the field of AI, who's now a professor in the MIT Media Lab and was co-founder and, for many years, director of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab.

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RITES OF PASSAGE
Week of April 25, 2001

Whether it's a birth or a bar mitzvah, a wedding or a funeral, we mark the stages of our lives with rituals and celebrations. Why are these occasions so important? This program explores the psychological and social implications of rites of passage. Guests include Dr. Ronald Grimes, a professor of religion and culture at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario, Canada; Karen Karbo writer of Generation Ex: Tales From the Second Wives Club; Dr. Stephen Balfour, who teaches courses on Contemporary American Rites of Passage at Texas A & M University; and Thomas Lynch, a poet, writer and undertaker.

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THE ELECTRIC BRAIN
Week of April 18, 2001

The Electric Brain probes the brain's natural electricity and how scientists are learning to bypass faulty wiring to help deaf people to hear, blind people to see, and depressed people to feel joy again.

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SCHIZOPHRENIA: SECOND CHANCES

Week of April 11, 2001


Dramatic advances in schizophrenia research are providing new hope for people suffering from the disease. In this show, we'll explore recent genetic discoveries, as well as new developments in medical and therapeutic treatment. Guests include Dr. Linda Brzustowicz, Associate Professor of Genetics at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Edith Shuttleworth, member of Fountain House; Dr. Nancy Andreasen, the Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry at The University of Iowa College of Medicine; Dr. Herbert Meltzer, Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Pharmacology at Vanderbilt Medical Center; and Dr. Xavier Amador, the Director of Psychology at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and a Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. Commentary by John Hockenberry. Read a summary of this show.


 

CONSCIOUSNESS
Week of March 27, 2001


This special one-hour program on consciousness explores an issue that has for centuries fascinated the greatest minds in philosophy, theology and the arts, and is now engaging some of the best minds in neuroscience as well. Using the latest technologies, scientists are beginning to unlock some of the hidden secrets of the human experience. But what happens to concepts like free will and the soul? You may be surprised. Guests include: Dr. Andrew Newberg, medical doctor, of the University of Pennsylvania Department of Radiology; Dr. Patricia Churchland, neurophilosopher, of the University of California at San Diego; Dr. Christof Koch, professor of computation and neural systems at the California Institute of Technology; Dr. David Chalmers, professor of philosophy at the University of Arizona and associate director of the university's Center for Consciousness Studies; Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, leader of the Shambhala tradition of Tibetan Buddhism; with a reading from Descartes' seminal "Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting the Reason, and Seeking Truth in the Sciences" by New York actor Bray Poor, and commentary by John Hockenberry.

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HORMONES AND THE MIND
Week of March 20, 2001


People often talk about being controlled by their hormones, but how do these chemicals really affect behavior? This week, we look at Hormones and the Mind. Guests include Dr. James McBride Dabbs, a Professor of Psychology who discusses testosterone and personality; Drs. Peter Schmidt and Catherine Roca from the National Institute of Mental Health, who explain the latest research on PMS; and Dr. Jeffrey Flier, an endocrinologist at Harvard Medical School, who explores the link between hormones and weight.

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DOUBLE JEOPARDY: MENTAL ILLNESS AND ADDICTION
Week of March 13, 2001


Mental illness and addiction: for 10 million Americans these debilitating disorders, hard enough to cope with on their own, are a deadly team. Sharing their first hand experiences with dual diagnoses are Robert, a client at New York's innovative Institution for Community Living, and writer Emily Carter. Former deputy drug czar Dr. Herbert Kleber and Jean Henry, clinical director of Journey House, in Louisville, Kentucky discuss challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint recalls the loss of his schizophrenic older brother to drug related suicide, and the mental health crisis among African-Americans. And Dr. H. Westley Clark, Director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, at the Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, outlines SAMSHA's strategies to further the mental health field's effectiveness in this field, and answers calls from concerned family members of those living with the double jeopardy of addiction and psychiatric illness.
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THE WORLD, TRANSLATED: BILINGUALISM
Week of February 28, 2001


The ins and outs of bilingual education have been hotly debated, but what is actually going on in the bilingual brain? This week we look at bilingualism, and what it tells us about the human capacity for making sense of the world around us. Guests include writer Julia Alvarez; Dr. Joy Hirsch, who heads a magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Dr. Ellen Bialystok, a cognitive psychologist who is Professor of Psychology at Toronto's York University; Lynette Holloway, an education reporter for the New York Times and commentary by John Hockenberry.
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ALTRUISM
Week of January 31, 2001

 

Is everything we do motivated by selfishness? Can a person ever act only in the best interest of another person? And when we do charitable acts -- such as giving money to a homeless person - is that a truly selfless act? Guests in this one hour program include Dr. C. Daniel Batson, professor of psychology at the University of Kansas in Lawrence; Emily Palmer, editor of "The Chronicle of Philanthropy;" a panel discussion with four religious leaders; Dr. Elliot Sober and Dr. David Sloan Wilson, authors of "Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior;" and John Hockenberry, commentator for The Infinite Mind.

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AUTISM: BEYOND THE SILENCE
Week of January 24, 2001
(Originally aired week of July 19, 1999)

Locked inside the silent world of the autistic child is an unimaginable richness of color, sensation and sound. As if an opera singer was performing a beautiful aria in the forest -- with no audience to hear. The brain of the autistic child becomes locked away, unreachable by language. Until recently blamed on bad parenting, autism is now known to be a genetic disorder, with medications and behavioral therapies able to help many children.

As reported cases of autism skyrocket, we hear from parents and people living with autistic disorders including Cure Autism Now founder and Hollywood producer Jonathan Shestack and author Temple Grandin, and the latest scientific research. Actor Anthony Edwards from the hit TV show ER shares his own experiences, and Suzanne Vega performs.

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THE INSANITY DEFENSE
Week of January 17, 2001


Everyone knows about the insanity defense, but not everyone realizes just how uncommon this verdict is. Nor do they understand the scrupulous and lengthy process that follows most acquittals by reason of insanity. This show explores the legal ins and outs of the rare insanity defense. Guests include law professor Richard Bonnie and forensic psychiatrist Dr. Philip Resnick. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

 

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SYNESTHESIA
Week of January 10, 2001

To some people, sounds are visual, numbers are colored, and tastes have shapes. Listen to - perhaps even glimpse - the world of synesthesia, where the senses merge in ways that are just beginning to be understood. Includes interviews with Vladimir Nabokov's synesthetic son, Dimitri, and synesthesia researcher Peter Grossenbacher. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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TOURETTE'S SYNDROME
Week of January 3, 2001
(Originally broadcast week of May 3, 2000)

The guttural noises, the sudden jerks of the head, the neck, the arms . . . the occasional curse word and the constant touching. We explore what's behind the constant need for motion and the uncontrollable urges which typify Tourette's Syndrome. Guests include Dr. Oliver Sacks, the internationally renowned author and neurologist, Dr. Joseph Jankovic of the Baylor College of Medicine and Dr. James Leckman of Yale University. Plus, Michael Wolff, the jazz pianist with Tourette's Syndrome who was the inspiration for the upcoming film Gregory Hines film, The Tic Code. Also, we'll hear about the latest genetic research and the search for the genes that code for Tourette's Syndrome. Plus, commentary by John Hockenberry.

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COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE
Week of December 27, 2000
(Originally broadcast week of January 19, 2000)

Two out of five Americans have tried some sort of complementary medicine, from herbs to acupuncture. In this program, we look at how some of these remedies are being used for the mind and the brain, and whether science supports the claims. Guests include Dr. James Balch, co-author of "Prescription for Nutritional Healing;" Dr. Jerry Cott of the National Institute of Mental Health; and Norman Rosenthal, author of "St. John's Wort: The Herbal Way to Feeling Good;" with commentary by John Hockenberry on Atlanta Braves pitcher John Rocker.

 

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OPTIMISM
Week of December 20, 2000
(Originally broadcast November 24, 1999)

Optimism is more than just a perspective . it's a scientifically quantifiable way to improve your chances of living a longer, healthier and even luckier life. This hour features the latest research in optimism, including a discussion with optimism expert Dr. Martin Seligman, a musical performance by rocker Heather Eatman, and, later in the show, a special report on the voting rights of psychiatric patients. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE

Broadcast beginning December 13, 2000
(Originally Broadcast March 15, 2000
)

Huntington's Disease is a fatal genetic neurological illness that strikes in mid-life and affects mind, body and behavior. It is the disease that took Woody Guthrie's life. Recent advances in gene science are encouraging, but as the information hasn't yet brought an effective cure or treatment, the knowledge poses more questions than answers at this point. There is now a test that can tell you if you'll develop the disease, but there is little doctors can do for you if you test positive. In this program, we learn about the discovery of the gene mutation that causes the disease, and about exciting progress toward better treatment. We also talk to people who have agonized over whether or not to be tested for the disease that claimed their parent. Guests include Dr. Christopher Ross, the Director of the Baltimore Huntington's Disease Center at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Dr. Adam Rosenblatt, the clinical director of the Baltimore Huntington's Disease Center at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.


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SEXUAL ATTRACTION
Broadcast beginning December 6, 2000
(Originally broadcast January 12, 2000)

Sexual attraction is the key to the perpetuation of the human species. It pervades our everyday lives in numerous ways, including how we behave, how we interact with each other, even the advertisements we see. In this hour of The Infinite Mind, we take a look at sexual attraction from the point of view of evolution, anthropology, biology -- and cabaret.
With David Buss, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas and the author of "The Evolution of Desire" and "The Dangerous Passion", and Helen Fisher, an anthropologist at Rutgers University and the author of "Anatomy of Love" and "The First Sex: The Natural Talents of Women and How they are Changing the World,"
cabaret performer Sidney Meyer, Dr. Charles Wysocki, a neuroscientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, and Dr. George Preti, a chemist at the Monell Center, and an adjunct professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania, Simon LeVay, whose 1990 report that he found differences between the size of the hypothalmus in gay and straight men sparked controversy. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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PSYCHOSIS

Broadcast beginning November 29, 2000


Psychosis: It's the frightening state of mind that most of us equate with "madness": delusions, paranoia, hearing voices. In truth, as many as 120 different conditions can cause psychosis, including drug and alcohol abuse, metabolic disorders, thyroid malfunction, head injuries, Alzheimer's and reactions to prescription medication. In this hour, we'll hear from an actively psychotic person, from successful individuals who've experienced psychosis and recovered, and from experts. Later in the program, we change directions to hear about new developments in neuroscience. Guests include: singer/songwriter Dory Previn, political consultant and former New York Times reporter Bob Boorstin, psychiatrist Dr. Murray Claytor; graduate student Leslie Greenblat, Dr. Wayne Fenton of the National Institute of Mental Health and Nature Neuroscience editor Dr. Charles Jennings.

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COMA
Broadcast beginning November 15, 2000


If we're to believe typical depictions on TV and in the movies, when someone wakes up from a coma, they get up, get out of bed and go straight back to their lives without missing a beat. That's not quite accurate. In this hour, we attempt to demystify the condition of coma:-what is it, how it's treated, how patients recover and its impact on the lives of survivors and their families. Guests include: Ian Elliot, coma survivor; Dr. Ronald Cranford of the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Dr. Nancy Childs of the Brown Schools Rehabilitation Center in Austin, Texas; Kay Guynes, whose son Michael is a coma survivor; Dr. Randall Chesnut of the Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, and Peter Quinn, the executive director of the Brain Trauma Foundation. we also visit the Center for Head Injuries at the JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Center in Edison, New Jersey. Commentary by John Hockenberry.

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PLAY
Broadcast beginning October 25, 2000

Play, the silly stuff of life, turns out to be more than just a good time. This hour of The Infinite Mind looks at the importance of play to both children and adults. We hear from a play therapist who explains how she uses play to help children, the director of a play room at a hospital's pediatric ward, as well as a toy designer and toy critic who discuss the role of technology in toys. Guests include: singer/songwriter Suzanne Vega; Dr. Diane Frey, Professor of Counseling at Wright State University; Sue Bratton, Clinical Director of the Counseling Department at the University of North Texas; and Cynthia Walter-Glickman, of the social work staff of Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center. Commentary by John Hockenberry.


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PAM'S STORY:
THE HIDDEN WORLD OF PERINATAL LOSS

Broadcast beginning October 18, 2000


Modern technology has dramatically increased the chances that a pregnancy will result in a live baby, but the fact is, not all endings are happy ones. Babies still die in utero, and often there is no reason ever found for the loss. Worse yet, no one ever talks about it. In this dramatic one-hour special report, an award-winning public radio producer follows her sister through a second pregnancy as she worries: Will it happen again?

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LANGUAGE AND
POPULAR CULTURE

Broadcast beginning October 11, 2000


Language is our most powerful tool. we use it to communicate our thoughts, our fears, our emotions and our ideas. This hour of The Infinite Mind explores the art and science of language in contemporary culture. We hear slang from the streets of New York City and from researchers who study slang among college students. A spoken word artist and a team of slam poets talk about how they use and manipulate language to explore their own lives. And a report on how and why minority communities take derogatory words aimed at them and embrace them for their own use. Guests include: Spalding Gray, spoken word artist; Dr. Connie Eble, an English professor and Linguist at University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; The Urbana Slam Poetry Team, the current National Slam Poetry Team Champions; and Dr. Ronald Butters, a professor of English and Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. Commentary by John Hockenberry.
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CELL PHONES
Broadcast beginning September 27, 2000


With 100 million Americans using cell phones, there's a great deal of interest in how their use affects the human body - and very little accurate information. In this hour, we hear from the top federal regulator as well as a journalist reporting on cell phone health effects. We also look at the impact on cell phones on the human psyche, and the etiquette of mobile phone use. Guests include: Dr. David Feigal of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Dr. Louis Slesin, editor of Microwave News; Dr. Lilli Friedland, an expert in the psychology of new technologies; reigning Mrs. Palm Beach County Jacqueline Whitmore, who runs the Protocol School of Palm Beach; and Dr. Charles Jennings, editor of the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience. Commentary by John Hockenberry. Read a summary of this show.


THE BIPOLAR CHILD
Broadcast beginning September 20, 2000

RAListen to this program now

As many as a third of the children diagnosed with ADD - Attention Deficit Disorder - are tragically misdiagnosed. Their tantrums, fidgetiness, self-abuse and inability to pay attention are signs of a major mental illness - bipolar disorder, or manic depression. Worse yet, the standard treatments for ADD - stimulants like Ritalin and anti-depressants like Prozac - can provoke violence, psychosis and even suicidal mania in bipolar children. Guests in this special program include Janice and Dr. Demitri Papolos, best-selling authors of a new and ground-breaking book on bipolar children, and Martha Hellander, director of the Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation. The Infinite Mind's host, Dr. Fred Goodwin, one of the world's leading authorities on bipolar disorder, leads the discussion.


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WOMEN AND MENTAL ILLNESS
Week of September 13, 2000

Women are more likely to have clinical depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. And their roles - particularly as mothers - can further compound their mental health problems. This program explores both the biological and social forces shaping women's experience of mental illness. Guests include Charlotte Willis, a mother and participant in the Thresholds Mothers Program, Rush Medical College professor of psychiatry Nada Stotland, documentary maker and women's studies professor, Allie Light, and Harvard University psychiatrist Lee Cohen.

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STORYTELLING
Week of September 6, 2000

The magic words "once upon a time" transport us to other worlds and other times. Storytelling is the primary technology of a preliterate age and has traveled through time to make its mark on history. Our brain constructs images and puts them into a narrative flow; our body projects those images onto an audience in front of the hearth, around a fire, sitting in the kitchen or on a stage. Guests include Diane Wolkstein, a master storyteller from New York City; Dr. Joseph Sobol, director of the Storytelling Graduate Program at East Tennessee State University and author of "The Storytellers' Journey: An American Revival;" Donald Davis, one of the nation's foremost storytellers; and Linda Blackman, founder and director of The Mothers' Living Stories Project. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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COURAGE

Week of August 30, 2000

What separates the ordinary neighbor from the heroic life-saver? The bystander from the holocaust rescuer? We'll look at the science and spectacle of courage. Guests on this show include sociologist Samuel Oliner, writer and lawyer, Harriet Johnson, psychologist Marvin Zuckerman, Carnegie medalist James Stack, and Tony Tedeschi, Ed Mislynski, and George Healy from the New York City Fire Department's Rescue Company One.


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DYSLEXIA
Week of August 23, 2000

As many as 1 in 7 American children are affected to some degree by dyslexia, which disables language skills but often bestows special abilities in the visual and spatial realm. This program explores what dyslexia is, and what it is not, with guests including author and producer Stephen J. Cannell, Thomas Viall of the International Dyslexia Association, Yale researcher Dr. Sally Shaywitz, Toronto entrepreneur Jay Mandarino, author Thomas G. West, virtual reality pioneer Daniel Sandin, children's author Jeanne Betancourt and her daughter, filmmaker Nicole Betancourt.

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TABOOS
Week of August 16, 2000

Why does every culture consider some behavior beyond the pale?

Taboos often seem to have some evolutionary purpose. But there's more to the rules that govern how we eat, sleep, and have sex - or, rather, how we don't. We'll explore emerging prohibitions in
contemporary society as well as persistent rules that have their roots in times past.

With Dr. Daniel Fessler of the UCLA department of anthropology and Dr. Paul Rozin, a disgust expert at the University of Pennsylvania department of psychology. We speak with Irvin James of the Navajo nation and Ben Jacobson, head of user research at the on-line consulting company, Razorfish. Also, learn about the mikvah and Jewish taboos around menstruation.

Plus commentary from Catharine Gates, author of Deviant Desires: Incredibly Strange Sex.

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BASIC BRAIN
Week of August 9, 2000

If you don't know your brain stem from your cerebellum, this is the show for you. This clear and understandable primer on the structure and workings of the human brain features performances by the Brainiacs improvisational comedy troupe.

Other guests include: Dr. Norbert Myslinski, University of Maryland professor and director of the International Brain Bee; Otilia Husu, 2000 Brain Bee winner; Dr. John Byrne of the University of Texas; Dr. Lawrence Katz of Duke University and author of "Keep Your Brain Alive: 83 Neurobic Exercises;" and Dr. Charles Jennings, editor of the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience.

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EPILEPSY
Week of August 2, 2000
(Originally aired week of September 20, 1999)

One out of every hundred people in the U.S. has epilepsy. Seizures have been attributed to everything from divinity to demonic possession. In this hour, we'll hear about the latest in epilepsy treatment and research. Plus, a look at cultural perceptions of epilepsy, and commentary by John Hockenberry.
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TASTE

Week of July 26, 2000
(Originally aired week of April 19, 2000)

Good taste? Tastes good? Our sense of taste helps us to navigate the world of food and the world of culture. We'll hear about what tastes good...and bad...and why. For instance, babies have a sweet-tooth at birth, and the taste for salt may be shaped by early dietary experiences. We talk to Jane and Michael Stern about their travels across the country in search of good food. Dr. Marcia Pelchat, from the Monell Taste and Smell Center demonstrates the link between taste and smell. We learn how Ben Cohen, of Ben and Jerry's fame, and his weak taste buds revolutionized the ice cream industry. We hear about the interaction between our brains and our taste buds, and the discovery of the newest taste: umami from Dr. Nirupa Chaudhari, a neurobiologist from the University of Miami. With the latest news on Huntington's Disease from the editor of the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience, plus commentary from John Hockenberry.

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PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY
Broadcast beginning week of July 19, 2000
(Originally aired week of February 2, 2000)


"You've got cancer" are some of the most frightening words anyone can hear. In this hour of The Infinite Mind, we'll talk about the psychology of cancer, a relatively new field called psycho-oncology. Drs. Jimmie Holland and David Payne of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center will talk about helping people cope with cancer diagnosis and treatment. These pioneers in this field will also discuss whether or not a positive attitude can help a person's prognosis. Plus, a visit to Gilda's Club, poetry from breast cancer survivors, helping kids cope with cancer, and commentary by John Hockenberry.

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PARENTING
Broadcast beginning week of July 12, 2000
(Originally aired week of February 16, 2000)


We all have questions about what makes a good parent. Theories come and go with every generation, but what concrete advice can experts give us? In this program, we talk to Dr. Marguerite Barratt, director of Michigan State University's Institute for Children, Youth and Families about parenting young children, and to Dr. Harold Koplowicz, director and founder of the New York University Child Study Center, about raising teenagers. We'll also hear from Judith Rich Harris, author of The Nurture Assumption, on just how much influence parents really have. Plus, a visit to a parenting workshop by popular authors Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish, a discussion with best-selling author Annie Lamott, a performance by children's singer and songwriter Laurie Berkner, and commentary by John Hockenberry.

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MENOPAUSE AND THE MIND

Week of June 28, 2000
(Originally aired week of September 28, 1999)

As thousands of boomers approach 50, we explore what happens to a woman's mind during menopause. Mood swings and memory loss are common complaints. With the latest science, menopause poetry and commentary by John Hockenberry.
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THE CLOSING OF
HAVERFORD STATE:
A SPECIAL REPORT

Week of June 21, 2000
(Originally aired week of March 15, 1999)



What happens when a psychiatric hospital closes down? Veteran radio correspondent
Joanne Silberner
took a year off from National Public Radio news to investigate the closing of one such hospital near Philadelphia. In this one-hour documentary, exclusive to The Infinite Mind, she follows the stories of patients and staff as they start their new lives.

This special report has won three major journalism awards since it was first broadcast in 1999, including a Clarion Award from the Association of Women in Communication, an EDI Award from National Easter Seals and a Deadline Award from Sigma Delta Chi, the Society of Professional Journalists.
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STONES, BONES, and BRAINS
Week of June 14, 2000

The skulls of early humans and our pre-human ancestors hold important clues to human evolution. We'll look at what scientists are learning from recent discoveries, and what the field of "paleoneurology" can tell us about our own brains. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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AMNESIA
Week of May 31, 2000

When most of us think of amnesia, we think of soap opera story-lines where a character returns from a long absence with no memory of their old life or as a plot twist in Hollywood films. But amnesia that severe, where someone forgets everything, is very uncommon. Guests include author Jill Robinson; Dr. Neal Cohen, head of the Amnesia Research Laboratory at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology; Dr. Brian Richards, who treats amnesia patients at The Baycrest Hospital in Toronto; author Jonathan Lethem, reading from his upcoming book "The Vintage Book of Amnesia;" and Professor Stephen Bertman, author of "Cultural Amnesia: America's Future and the Crisis of Memory." Plus, commentary by John Hockenberry.

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PLACEBO EFFECT
Week of May 24, 2000


The "placebo effect" is astonishingly large. Between 35 and 75 percent of patients report feeling better from taking an inert pill during trials of new drugs. But what is the placebo effect, and how does it work. And if placebos can help so many people feel better, should they be used as treatment? Guests include Dr. Jon Levine , professor of medicine and the director of the National Institutes of Health Pain Center at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center; Dr. Walter Brown, clinical professor of psychiatry at Brown University School of Medicine and Tufts University School of Medicine; Dr. Fred Quitkin, professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University; comedian David Brenner; New York Post columnist Gersh Kuntzman; and commentator John Hockenberry.

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DREAMS
Week of May 17, 2000

All of us dream: four or five times each night, 100,000 times over the course of a lifetime, about four solid years of dreaming. In this program, host Dr. Fred Goodwin explores the mystery and the science of dreams, with guests Rita Dwyer, Dr. Alan Siegel, lucid dream expert Dr. Stephen LaBerge, author Spalding Gray and musical guest Carrie Newcomer. With commentary by John Hockenberry.

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EMOTIONS
Week of May 10, 2000

Emotions are an integral part of being human. But what makes us happy, sad, or angry? What can science tell us about what happens in the brain when we experience emotion? In this program, we talk about the science of emotions. Guests include: Dr. Antonio Damasio, head of the Department of Neurology at the University of Iowa, and the author of The Feeling of What Happens: Body, Emotion, and the Making of Consciousness published by Harcourt Brace; Candace Pert, research professor in the department of physiology at Georgetown University Medical School, and the author of Molecules of Emotion, published by Simon & Schuster; Jack Katz, professor of sociology at UCLA, and the author of How Emotions Work, published by the University of Chicago Press; and Dempsey Rice, a producer for The Infinite Mind and producer/director of the HBO documentary film Daughter of Suicide. Plus, actors from the Classic Stage Company's recent production of Naked.

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HOW WE LEARN
Week of April 26, 2000

What happens in the brain when we learn? What do we know about learning, and how can it be applied in practical situations, like schools? In this hour, we talk to scientists and educators about applying research to learning. Guests include Dr. Kurt Fischer, the director of the Mind, Brain and Education program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; Dr. William Greenough, chair of the Neuroscience Program at the University of Illinois; Dr. Ted Sizer, founder of the Coalition of Essential Schools; and Patmore Lewis, violinist with the New York Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.

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LYME DISEASE
Week of April 12, 2000

Lyme disease is usually thought of as a relatively benign illness, causing a rash and flu-like symptoms. But when left untreated, this tick-borne illness can become serious, and can cause neurological and psychological symptoms, including facial paralysis, memory loss, and mood changes. We'll talk to Dr. Patricia Coyle, professor of neurology at the School of Medicine at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Dr. Brian Fallon, the Director of the Lyme Disease Research program at the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. Plus, a first person account of living with chronic Lyme Disease, an update on the West Nile Virus which sickened dozens of New Yorkers last year, some with deadly encephalitis, and commentary from John Hockenberry.

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MEMORY
Week of April 5, 2000

New memory research is teaching scientists how the brain remembers, why it forgets, and, potentially, how to improve memory. In this hour, we talk about the new research. We also dispel some common memory myths, talk to kids about memory, and visit a memory enhancement class. Plus, singer/songwriter Dar Williams remembers her childhood in song, and commentary from John Hockenberry.

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  GRIEF
Week of March 29, 2000

Grief is a natural dimension of human life. As poet (and undertaker) Thomas Lynch puts it, "Grief is a sign of our humanity. It's the tax we pay on our attachments." Although grief that evolves into clinical depression may demand medical treatment, too often American culture unnecessarily pathologizes grief, or tries to fit the most individual of processes into simplistic "stage" models. This week we speak with leading experts on grief, visit the Day of the Dead celebration in Oaxaca, Mexico, and hear from teenagers in East Harlem who have experienced the death of family and friends. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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INSTINCTS
Week
beginning March 22, 2000

Instincts are among the very earliest influences on human behavior. These primitive motivations that we share with animals are being unlocked by modern neuroscience. To find out more, we visit with a Harvard University researcher who looks at animal instincts in order to advance our knowledge of human instincts. Plus the researcher who found the location of the maternal instinct in the brain. We'll also hear from a geographer, whose life work has focused how we move through the world, was challenged . by sudden blindness. Plus - the latest from Nature Neuroscience magazine as we ask the age-old question: "Why won't men ask for directions?"


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STRESS
Broadcast beginning March 1, 2000

We all experience stress, but where does it come from, and how does it affect us? In this program, we'll hear from Dr. Robert Sapolsky of Stanford University, author of "Why Zebras Don't Get Stress" and Boston University stress expert Dr. David Barlow about how stress affects our minds and bodies, and what we can do it about. We'll also go through a guided meditation with Sharon Gannon of Jivamukti Yoga Center, and hear first-hand from Tony Calvano about the stress of dropping the New Year's Millenium Ball in Times Square. Plus, John Hockenberry on his own "stress addiction."
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TWINS
Broadcast beginning February 9, 2000

Nature? Or nurture? Twins may hold the answer. Identical twins raised apart report eerie similarities in lifestyle and preferences. Host Dr. Fred Goodwin, himself a twin, leads this exploration of the world of twin-ness. Guests include Dr. Nancy Segal, author of "Entwined Lives;" Dr. Thomas Bouchard, who directs the Minnesota Twin Study; Dr. Goodwin's twin brother Cliff; and two sets of identical twins, including brothers separated as infants and reunited after 40 years apart, along with "twin ambassadors" Debbie and Lisa Ganz. With commentary by John Hockenberry, father of twins Zoe and Olivia.

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THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT AND THE BRAIN
Week of January 4, 2000 (Originally aired the Week of July 12, 1999)

The Human Genome project has been working to map every gene in the human body. Scientists believe more than half of those genes relate to the mind. So what will all this information tell us about the way our brains work? Will we know who will become mentally ill and how to prevent that? And what will we do with that information?
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HUMOR
Week of December 29, 1999 (Originally aired Week of October 19, 1998)

This week, The Infinite Mind looks at humor. What's involved in humor? What makes things funny? Where does funny live in our brains? Things are funny when they don't quite fit--when they're divorced from their normal context, or when they violate a pattern. There's often an element of discomfort in humor--maybe because we sense that violation. Humor can relieve anxiety, dissolve conflict, and be used as a tool for teaching. Dr. Fred Goodwin talks about humor with some of America's top comedians--including Margaret Cho, Peter Bergman and Phil Proctor of the Firesign Theater, Robert Klein, and Anne Beatts, an original writer for Saturday Night Live. They reveal how they generate their material, talk about secrets of comic timing, and discuss the relationship between humor and social commentary. Dr. Goodwin also interviews scientists who've researched humor in different cultures and found a spot in the brain that when stimulated generates laughter and feelings of amusement.
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GENERATIONS
Week of December 22, 1999 (Originally aired Week of June 28, 1999)

In pre-industrialized societies, children learned the history, tradition and values of the cultures through their contact with elders. Today, kids hang with kids, middle-aged people go away to work and older people live in nursing homes or in Florida. This program looks at how our mobile, urban, technological world has segregated the generations, the consequences, and what some are doing to bridge this ever-widening generation gap.
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POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER: MEMORIES OF WAR
Week of December 15, 1999 (Originally aired Week of June 14, 1999)

Psychological trauma can leave hidden landmines in the psyche. Dr. Goodwin speaks with Dr. Matthew Friedman, director of the National Center for PTSD, about the impact of trauma on combat veterans and others. Later in the program, a discussion about a ground-breaking program treating Vietnam veterans with PTSD who are addicted to drugs and alcohol. Dr. Goodwin talks with Dr. Beverly Donovan, who directs the program, and to Belleruth Naparstek, creator of the best-selling Health Journeys guided imagery tape series. Commentary by John Hockenberry.
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THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PERSUASION
Week of December 8, 1999 (Originally aired Week of May 24, 1999)

Persuasion is all around us, from advertising to political campaigns to getting the kids dressed in the morning. But how does it work, and in what ways are we persuaded without even knowing it? In this hour, Dr. Goodwin talks to experts on different types of persuasion about what it is, how it works, and what to look out for. His guests are communications professor Dr. Kathy Kellerman, ad executive Ken Krimstein and persuasion researcher Dr. Anthony Pratkanis. Additionally, we sit in on a medical hypnosis session.
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ALZHEIMER'S
Week of December 1, 1999 (Originally aired Week of June 1, 1999)

It's called the disease from which people die twice. Only a few generations back, our bodies wore out long before our minds. Today, living longer can also mean losing one's mental capacity to Alzheimer's, a debilitating and terminal disease. However, dramatic inroads in research could lead to the prevention and treatment of this disease within the next decade. This program also looks at geriatric depression. Guests include: Dr. Trey Sunderland from the National Institute of Mental Health, Judy Riggs of the Alzheimer's Association, filmmaker Deborah Hoffmann and Dr. Dan Blazer of Duke University Medical Center.
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GROUPS
Week of November 10, 1999

Do groups really have their own personality and behavior? Are there really such things as "mass hysteria" and "mass hallucination?" The latest research on why people in groups behave the way they do, and how some are turning these theories to their advantage. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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STONES, BONES, and BRAINS
Week of November 3, 1999

The skulls of early humans and our pre-human ancestors hold important clues to human evolution. We'll look at what scientists are learning from recent discoveries, and what the field of "paleoneurology" can tell us about our own brains. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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TEEN SUICIDE
Week of October 27, 1999

Teen suicide has increased three-fold since the 1950s, while overall suicide rates have leveled off in recent years. There are some 4,000 teen suicides each year, and an estimated 80,000 attempted suicides. In this hour, we'll look at the risk factors, warning signs, and ways to prevent suicide among young people, and talk to the U.S. Surgeon General about his Call To Action to Prevent Suicide.
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MANAGING MADNESS
Week of October 20, 1999

In this hour, we look at how managed care is managing mental illness, with the suggestion that perhaps it isn't managing very well at all. We talk to doctors and therapists, and investigate managed care decision-making and its sometimes-fatal consequences. We also visit a unique health care program in Minnesota that bypasses insurance companies altogether. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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OUTBREAK: The Search for the Encephalitis Bug
Week of October 6, 1999

This special report of The Infinite Mind focuses on the mosquito-borne virus that's sickened dozens of New Yorkers with symptoms ranging from headache and fever to encephalitis and death. In this hour, we hear from residents of affected neighborhoods, from the scientific detectives on the front lines, from a physician who specializes in infectious diseases, and from experts on the chemicals used to kill infected mosquitoes. We also look at the likelihood of the disease spreading to other parts of the U.S.
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SPORTS-MINDED: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
Week of September 13, 1999 (Originally aired the week of October 5, 1998)

The psychology and brain science of athletic performance. Hear about the secret mind-body techniques used by top athletes, from the sports psychologist for the U.S. Olympic ski team and Ohio State's football team, five-time American league batting champ Wade Boggs, and sportswriter extraordinare George Plimpton.
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POST-POLIO SYNDROME
Week of September 6, 1999 (Originally aired the week of March 8, 1999)

Forty-four years ago this April, Jonas Salk developed the Polio vaccine and the terrible epidemic was eliminated. Or was it? for more than 1.6 million Americans there has been no cure. Survivors of polio who believed they had put the disease behind them forever find they are once again struggling with chronic symptoms. Along with the debilitating physical aspects, survivors also face the emotional devastation of Post-Polio Syndrome. Later in the program, a study on "contagious" emotions is discussed, with commentary by John Hockenberry..
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FEARS & PHOBIAS
Week of September 1, 1999 (Originally aired week of May 3, 1999)

Fear is normal. If we didn't have a fight or flight instinct, our species would have died out a long time ago. But some people are ruled by fear, by phobias that dictate where they go and what they do or, more commonly, where they don't go and what they don't do. This week on The Infinite Mind, you'll hear from people who have phobias and from doctors who treat them; about the difference between fears and phobias; about the regions and chemicals in the brain responsible for fear and anxiety; and about a virtual reality program used to treat fear of flying.
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BODY IMAGE
Week of August 23, 1999 (Originally aired the week of March 22, 1999)

For many people, looking in the mirror can be an unpleasant experience. For others, however, it can be devastating. From gay men on a quest to build Adonis-like bodies to ballet dancers who slowly starve themselves, thousands of Americans suffer from a distorted body image. This week's The Infinite Mind looks at eating disorders as well as a lesser-known condition called body dysmorphic disorder, or BDD. (The summary contains a link to a BDD self-test.) Also in this show, Suzanne Vega reads one of her short stories and commentator John Hockenberry spins a tale about men, old suits and a magical seamstress named Mrs. Zotta.
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ADDICTION
Week of August 16, 1999 (Originally aired the week of July 6, 1998)

Drugs, alcohol and cigarettes: Top experts reveal the latest research on the sometimes fatal attraction of substance use and abuse. And we'll learn why it's so hard for depressed people to give up smoking. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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PAIN
Week of August 9, 1999 (Originally aired the week of September 28, 1998)

What is pain? Stories from people who've learned to live with it, the latest research, and some unconventional methods anyone can use for controlling pain. Plus, people who've awakened during painful surgery campaign for better anesthesia practices.
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MANIC DEPRESSIVE ILLNESS
Week of August 2, 1999 (Originally aired week of October 12, 1998)

With an untreated suicide rate of 20 to 25 percent, manic depressive illness (also called bipolar disorder) ranks among the most fatal diseases in medicine. Why is it such a killer? For one thing, it's a long way down for a person falling from the HEIGHTs of mania to the depths of depression. We'll talk to top experts about this, and about new research that could narrow the gap between "average" and "optimal" treatments. Plus, a whole range of brand-new diagnoses that may leave you wondering whether everybody isn't a little bit bipolar.
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ANIMAL INTELLIGENCE
Week of July 26, 1999 (Originally aired week of October 26, 1998)

We tend to think our pets are smart. But is this is wishful thinking? Without a common language, how can we access whatever intelligence animals possess? We speak with leading animal researchers who explain how dolphins, birds, and chimpanzees demonstrate impressive problem-solving skills and evidence of abstract thought. We hear from Alex, the world's most famous African Grey parrot, who does a lot more than imitate human speech. We take a look at orang utans in the National Zoo who 'commute' to an 'office' complete with keyboards and coffee cups, and hear from the nation's leading pet therapist, who offers helpful tips for callers with pet problems. With commentary on animal intelligence (and human stupidity) from John Hockenberry.
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YOUTH VIOLENCE
Week of July 5, 1999

Youth violence has been in the news and on the minds of politicians and the public since school shootings brought the topic to front pages around the country. But scientists have been studying ways to predict and prevent it for decades. In this hour, we'll hear what they've learned, what biology can tell us about violence and what kids have to say on the subject. Guests include Dr. Carl Bell, Dr. John Coie, Michael English and Dr. Debra Neihoff
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PHYSICAL BECOMES MENTAL
Week of June 21, 1999

Sometimes psychological symptoms like depression, psychosis or mania aren't a sign of mental illness, but a sign of physical illness. Diseases like thyroid disorders, multiple sclerosis and AIDS can have symptoms that might make you questions your mental health, and often these symptoms are the first signs of physical illness. In this hour, we hear about such illnesses from physicians who try to spot them and people who suffer from them. The guests are Dr. Caroline Carney-Doebbeling, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and an expert in the area of combined illness, Dr. Tom Wise, Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Inova/Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Virginia and Professor and Vice Chairman at Georgetown University, Dr. Bradford Navia, an Associate Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry at Tufts University Medical School in Boston, and Camille Chatterjee, the news editor of Psychology Today.
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INTELLIGENCE
Week of June 7, 1999

Intelligence is a word we use everyday. But what does it really mean? Is it a single, measurable factor, or a combination of factors? In this hour, Dr. Goodwin talks to experts about what we mean when we talk about intelligence, how we measure it, and how it relates to performance in school, work and life. Plus, a special report from the White House Conference on Mental Health. We hear from President Clinton, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Al and Tipper Gore and others at this summit meeting on care for people with mental illneses.
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WHERE IS THE MIND?
Week of May 10, 1999

Where is the mind? We talk about gut feelings and following our hearts, but most people would say that the mind is in the brain. Some researchers, however, disagree. This week on The Infinite Mind, Dr. Goodwin talks to scientists who argue that the mind is not limited to the brain. You'll hear about the mind of the gut, the mind as property of the body, and the mind of the heart.
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IT IS BRAIN SURGERY
Week of April 26, 1999 (Originally aired week of February 1, 1999)

This week we explore the latest developments in brain surgery, that most delicate of arts. Learn about the history of brain surgery from the Renaissance to the present day as Dr. Goodwin hosts top surgeons and a pioneer in 'split-brain' studies who explains what "left-brained" and "right-brained" really mean. Plus we go inside the operating room, hear the sound of neurons firing in the brain, and hear from both doctor and patient during surgery. Also, commentary from John Hockenberry.
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VISION
Week of April 19, 1999 (Originally aired week of January 25, 1999)

Did you know that a quarter of your brain is devoted to vision? This week on The Infinite Mind, Dr. Goodwin speaks with Nobel Prize-winning vision researcher Dr. David Hubel, who takes listener calls. You'll also hear from best-selling author and neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks about the real-life patient behind the new movie At First Sight. Plus new technology for visually impaired people and vision therapy for musicians. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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FREUD'S FRIENDS
Week of April 12, 1999 (Originally aired week of January 18, 1999)

It's been nearly 100 years since Sigmund Freud published his first work on psychoanalysis. Since then, he's become a household name--overshadowing other pioneering investigators of the mind. We hear Freud's own words, as read by Robert Klein, and learn about Freud's teacher Jean-Martin Charcot and contemporaries such as Pierre Janet and Sandor Ferenczi. Jonathan Katz, the alter ego of Comedy Central's Dr. Katz, professional therapist, answers common questions about therapy. Plus a visit with contemporary analysts, the lastest news from Psychology Today, and commentary on rage and impulse control from John Hockenberry.
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OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
Week of April 5, 1999 (Originally aired week of January 11, 1999)

Everyone has straightened a picture frame, wondered if they locked the door, or washed their hands after touching something dirty. For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, or OCD, everyday worries and actions like these become insistent, anxiety-producing thoughts, and rituals that must be performed to ease that anxiety. This week on The Infinite Mind, you'll hear what it's like to live with OCD; about successful new treatments for the condition; and about the surprising link between OCD in children and common strep throat. With commentary from John Hockenberry.
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INSOMNIA
Week of March 31, 1999

One-third of Americans, in a recent survey, reported experiencing a bout of insomnia in the past year. One-sixth of Americans rated their insomnia as "serious." This program looks at the role of sleep and the causes and treatments of insomnia, including a new Harvard program that attacks insomnia through behavior modification. We will travel to the Amazon rain forest to learn about "dream-change" with native shamans. Also, author John Updike reads a poem on his own sleeplessness and John Hockenberry speculates about the two kinds of sleepers.
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CREATIVITY
Week of March 1, 1999

Creativity can be mysterious--even to those who earn their livelihood by practicing it. This week, we shed some light on the creative process and talk to leading researchers about artistic, scientific, and corporate creativity. We also hear from a chef, a poet, and singer/songwriter Suzanne Vega. Plus, creativity and mental illness, and John Hockenberry explains why "creative" is not always a compliment.
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CHARACTER
Week of February 22, 1999

Character is a word we hear often from our political and religious leaders. But what does it really mean? And what can we do to make sure young people develop it? Join Dr. Goodwin as he speaks with an elementary school principal, an expert in adolescent psychology, and an evolutionary biologist who studies the science behind unselfish behavior. Hear an Afro-Caribbean folktale that teaches character. Also commentary on character by John Hockenberry. And on another topic, we hear about a disturbing report on psychiatric patients dying while in restraints.
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PARKINSON'S DISEASE
Week of February 15, 1999

Join Dr. Goodwin as we explore what's new in treatment, research, and advocacy for Parkinson's Disease. Learn about tap-dancing to strengthen Parkinsonian's muscles, dogs who help patients with their balance, and the latest research indicating that for most people Parkinson's is NOT a genetic disease. Featured guests include Dr. J. William Langston of the Parkinson's Institute and Jean Samuelson, founder of the Parkinson's Action Network. With commentary from John Hockenberry.
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ROMANCE
Week of February 8, 1999 (Originally aired November 23, 1998)

Is there one true love for everyone, a soul mate waiting to be found? Or, is true love something that develops over time? Just in time for Valentine's Day, we repeat this program exploring approaches to romance from differing perspectives, both ancient (arranged marriages) and technological (Internet relationships). With commentary by John Hockenberry and Anne Beatts, one of Saturday Night Live's original writers.
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VISION
Week of January 25, 1999

Did you know that a quarter of your brain is devoted to vision? This week on The Infinite Mind, Dr. Goodwin speaks with Nobel Prize-winning vision researcher Dr. David Hubel, who takes listener calls. You'll also hear from best-selling author and neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks about the real-life patient behind the new movie At First Sight. Plus new technology for visually impaired people and vision therapy for musicians. With commentary by John Hockenberry.
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OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
Week of January 11, 1999

Everyone has straightened a picture frame, wondered if they locked the door, or washed their hands after touching something dirty. For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, or OCD, everyday worries and actions like these become insistent, anxiety-producing thoughts, and rituals that must be performed to ease that anxiety. This week on The Infinite Mind, you'll hear what it's like to live with OCD; about successful new treatments for the condition; and about the surprising link between OCD in children and common strep throat. With commentary from John Hockenberry.
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THE INFANT MIND
Week of January 4, 1999 (Originally aired June 29, 1998)

How important is a child's environment to the fateful first year of life? What are the respective roles of genes, and the way we treat an infant, in defining the type of person they become? Researchers report how babies respond to nurturing and learn languages. Plus the trials of a child prodigy, John Hockenberry, and your calls.
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MEN AND DEPRESSION: THE TRAGEDY OF J. TIMOTHY HOGAN
Week of December 28, 1998 (Originally aired September 21, 1998)

Is our nation's health care system able to help people suffering from depression? Tim Hogan, a Massachusetts newspaper publisher, repeatedly sought help but found none, and committed suicide. In an exclusive interview, his family speaks publicly for the first time. Experts and advocates say Hogan's experience is common -- and unacceptable.
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MEDITATION
Week of December 21, 1998 (Originally aired June 22, 1998)

Why do so many people do it and what are the health effects? Also, researchers watch the brains of Tibetan monks on a brain scan and see evidence that there's a spot in the brain that appears to be "hard-wired for God." Includes the Dalai Lama at a health care seminar at New York's Beth Israel Hospital.
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THE CRIMINAL MIND
Week of December 14, 1998 (Originally aired June 15, 1998)

Murderers, stalkers, child abusers and people who shoot up their workplace -- what makes these people act the way they do? With top experts including criminal psychiatrist Dr. Park Dietz, consultant on cases ranging from the Unabomber to Jeffery Dahmer to the Menendez brothers.
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MULTIPLE PERSONALITY DISORDER
Week of December 8, 1998 (Originally aired June 8, 1998)

A controversial diagnosis which some doctors do not believe exists. But other experts say this disorder may give us clues about the ability of the brain to rewire itself after injury. We talk to top researchers and also hear from people diagnosed with MPD about the fascinating details of their "reintegration."
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HAPPINESS
Week of November 30, 1998 (Originally aired June 1, 1998)

We all wish we could be happier, and new scientific studies show that it may be within our own control. With happiness expert Dr. David Myers and Professor Mihaly Csikszentmihaly, whose book, Flow, looks at "optimum experience" and how to maximize that state of being.
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SCHIZOPHRENIA
Week of November 9, 1998 (Originally aired May 25, 1998)

What is schizophrenia? What's it like to experience its symptoms? Dr. Goodwin and several top researchers and advocates discuss the most recent developments in our understanding of schizophrenia and how to treat it. Psychologist Fred Frese, who himself has schizophrenia, explains that for the schizophrenic, life can be dreamlike. The ability to determine what is true, to control one's actions, to distinguish between internal and external aspects of one's experience -- all can be altered. The ability to communicate with people who do not have schizophrenia may be lost.
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ANXIETY
Week of November 2, 1998 (Originally aired May 4, 1998)

With Dr. Steven Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, Mary Guardino of the national advocacy group Freedom From Fear and Dr. Michael Davis, a top anxiety researcher at Yale University Medical Center. Includes discussion of anxiety and panic disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and phobias, along with listener phone calls. Plus, John Hockenberry reflects on the wonder of new life, and news from the editors of Psychology Today magazine.
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ARE MENTALLY ILL PEOPLE MORE VIOLENT?
Week of September 14, 1998

Mental illness often appears in the media in connection with violent acts, so that fairly or not, many think the two are linked. Are they? Top mental health experts and advocates disagree on that connection, and on how it affects public policy.
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REWIRING THE BRAIN
Week of September 7, 1998

People recovering from stroke and traumatic brain injury demonstrate that the ability of the brain to rewire and reprogram itself is much greater than previously thought. New methods of rehabilitation are changing lives, and the way neuroscientists think about the human brain.
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BODY CLOCKS
Week of September 1, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of April 27, 1998)

Think better in the afternoon? Sleep better in the winter? Suffer jet lag? The mind and body have not one but several internal clocks. Understanding how they work can help you manage your health and energy. Plus John Hockenberry trades in his alarm clock for a personal power tool, and listener calls.
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FEED YOUR BRAIN
Week of August 24, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of April 20, 1998)

Top nutritional experts talk about eating for a healthy brain. With Dr. Andrew Weil, author of the best-selling books Spontaneous Healing and Eight Weeks To Optimum Health. With John Hockenberry and listener calls.
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THE EVOLUTION OF MIND
Week of August 17, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of April 13, 1998)

Just what is the mind; and how did it come to be the complex system that it is today? Guests include Dr. Steven Pinker, author of the best-selling How The Mind Works, and evolutionary psychiatrist Dr. Randolph Nesse. With John Hockenberry and listener calls.
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FORGIVENESS
Week of August 10, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of April 6, 1998)

"As we forgive those who trespass against us" seems to have a basis in fact. New scientific research indicates that people who forgive are healthier and happier than those who hold a grudge -- no matter how deep the wound. We'll be joined by leading forgiveness -- including former hostage Terry Anderson. Also -- every generation thinks their kids are the most trouble ever -- we'll examine if today's kids are the most violent. With John Hockenberry and listener calls.
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URGENCY ADDICTION
Week of August 3, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of March 30, 1998)

Are you addicted to adrenaline? Living on the edge of constant crisis? Worse yet - do you prefer life that way? Cell phones, e-mail and the Internet are making "urgency addicts" out of all of us. Here's the science behind your body's response to this assault on the mind, the consequences - and what you can do about it.
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SUICIDE: WHO'S AT RISK
Week of July 27, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of March 9, 1998)

Breakthroughs in biochemistry help predict the risk of suicide. Plus: Adolescent Suicide: new studies provide vital information for parents. Guests include prominent suicide researchers Dr. Jan Fawcett, Dr. David Clark and songwriter Suzanne Vega and we talk with those who have come back from the brink of suicide. Plus: Why a Japanese cartoon, coming soon to the U.S., sent 700 children to the hospital.
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PRAYER, HEALING, AND THE MIND
Week of July 20, 1998 (originally broadcast the week of March 2, 1998)

New, scientific research says prayer does heal. Medical researchers, clergy, and patients provide startling new insights into these "miracles of medicine." Guests include Dr. Larry Dossey, who has written six books on the subject, including the best-selling Healing Words. In addition, "Is a smile the best medicine?" -- The Infinite Mind's David Furst reports from a convention of therapists who specialize in humor.
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SCHIZOPHRENIA
Week of May 25, 1998

What is schizophrenia? What's it like to experience its symptoms? Dr. Goodwin and several top researchers and advocates discuss the most recent developments in our understanding of schizophrenia and how to treat it. Psychologist Fred Frese, who himself has schizophrenia, explains that for the schizophrenic, life can be dreamlike. The ability to determine what is true, to control one's actions, to distinguish between internal and external aspects of one's experience -- all can be altered. The ability to communicate with people who do not have schizophrenia may be lost.
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BETTER LIVING THROUGH CHEMISTRY?
Week of May 11, 1998

Should doctors prescribe pharmaceuticals for life enhancement? From Rogaine for nicer hair to Prozac for personality to the new anti-impotency drug Viagra, it's a question increasingly debated.
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ADULT ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER Week of March 23, 1998

ADD affects more than children -- doctors know it's often a grown-up disorder that can cripple smart, creative adults. But breakthroughs in treatment offer new hope. Featuring performance artist, Reno, star of the upcoming HBO documentary, Reno Finds Her Mom. Plus: a national advocacy group fights for the rights of mentally ill kids behind bars.

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HYPERSEXUALITY: The Story Behind the Story of the Mary Kay Letourneau Case
Week of March 16, 1998

Why in her right mind would a 36-year-old school teacher have sex with a 13-year-old boy? And when she was released from prison on the strict condition that she never see him again, why would she go right back to him? Her doctor and her lawyer say there is good evidence that she was not in her right mind at all. Their position is that a mental illness, manic depressive illness, and a condition often related to manic depression -- called hypersexuality -- provides an explanation for her seemingly irrational behavior.
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SLEEP
Aired in December, 1997

In the premiere program, Dr. Fred Goodwin takes a fascinating look at sleep and our lives -- why we sleep, the role of dreams, why some people can't sleep, why some people can't not. We hear about a recent study that puts people in the dark for 12 hours a day and examined their nocturnal patterns, we hear from a man who, literally and involuntarily, acts out his dreams, a narcoleptic who can't stay awake, and from John Updike on insomnia. We also hear about the effects of not sleeping on clinical depression.

 

 

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